Why we’ll soon be eating more farmed fish

QUEENSLANDERS should expect to eat more farmed rather than wild fish in the coming years, with current fishing regulations unable to keep up with a rapidly growing population.

It comes as a State Government committee continues to debate controversial new laws around commercial and recreational fishing, some of which came into effect at the start of this month.

Deputy Director-General of Fisheries Graeme Bolton told a committee hearing into the new fishing laws that consumer demand will mean more and more fish will be produced through aquaculture farms.

"One of the key things to note is that the world population is growing significantly and our current level through the wild-caught fisheries will not be enough to support the need for protein moving forward," he said.

"So, a key response to that moving forward is going to be aquaculture. It's not about one over the other, they're both needed and they'll both be required moving forward."

During the hearing today, former restaurant manager and member for Mount Ommaney Jess Pugh raised concerns around the quality of farmed as opposed to wild barramundi.

"I've got my restaurant manager hat on and thinking about making sure you've got that consistency of supply," she said.

"We always used to joke that farmed barramundi was muddy barramundi - it didn't have the same lovely taste as the fresh stuff."

It comes as Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced last month that Tasmanian seafood producer Tassal is set to open a major new aquaculture facility north of Mackay.

Aquaculture farms already produce a significant amount of fish consumed in Queensland, making up 38 per cent in 2017-18.

The new fishing laws include "no take" periods on certain seafood species, new limits on the size and amount of seafood that can be taken, and tough new penalties for those who are found to be fishing illegally.



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