Samuel Johnson with Stevie Collins, Riley Wainwright, Jed Esson, Jack McCarthy, James Bourke, Tanner Henley, Jesse Bohm and Kate Paganin.
Samuel Johnson with Stevie Collins, Riley Wainwright, Jed Esson, Jack McCarthy, James Bourke, Tanner Henley, Jesse Bohm and Kate Paganin. Bianca Hrovat

Who can say no to a dying wish?

AFTER his sister was diagnosed with the cancer that would ultimately end her life, Love your Sister founder Samuel Johnson walked away.

Or rather, he wheeled away, on a giant, bright pink unicycle designed to grab the attention of every Australian and make sure none of them had to go through the heartache his sister and her family were facing.

At Scots PGC College on Friday, Mr Johnson faced a sea of students wearing that same breast cancer pink and told them how he didn't have a choice in the matter.

"She blackmailed me," he said, and the children laughed.

"She looked at me and she told me I had to go find all the mums and make sure they're breast aware.

"And who says no to a dying wish?"

The students fell silent as they listened to Mr Johnson recall how he cycled around the country for 364 days, ignoring the inevitable pain in his crotch and educating kids just like them about the importance of self-checks in preventing cancer deaths.

"I can't get to everyone but I'm going to die trying," he said.

The Dancing with the Stars finalist described how his sister put her children's health before her own, waited too long to get checked and ultimately lost her chance to continue being a mother.

 

James Bourke learns about cancer and unicycling from Samuel Johnson.
James Bourke learns about cancer and unicycling from Samuel Johnson. Bianca Hrovat

Mr Johnson hopped from foot to foot on stage as he struggled to hold back tears.

"I don't care about the money, I don't want your donations, I just want you tell your mum to check her boobs," he said.

"We all have the potential to save a life."

Media officer Helen Bohm said the extreme lengths Mr Johnson went to for his sister set a great example for the students.

"It's a good opportunity to learn how to help others," she said.

"Everyone can do something, even if it's small."

 

Briana Groves, Abbey Peterson, Stevie Collins and Kate Paganin spread the love.
Briana Groves, Abbey Peterson, Stevie Collins and Kate Paganin spread the love. Bianca Hrovat

"You can blame the weird guy on the unicycle for making you do it," he said.

Every student, parent and teacher raised their hand.



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