What your partner really wanted for Valentine’s Day

IF YOU splurged on an extravagant Valentine's Day gift, you may want to rethink next year's plans.

New research shows Australians don't actually want roses or fancy dinners.

So what do women, and men really want?

Quality time with our loved ones was at the top of the list for 73 percent of the 1000 people in the study.

But it's not all hearts and flowers, with one in 10 getting stressed out by trying to show the love with the right gift, organising date night and all that added pressure.

The study also found only two percent of us want roses and less than four percent want a fancy dinner.

In fact less than one in 10 actually wanted to be wined and dined on Valentine's Day, so how do you declare your love?

If you ask Spicers Retreats, who commissioned the study, they reckon a trip away ticks all the boxes.

Spicers Retreats Group Operations Manager Ms Andrea Martin said there had been a large spike in bookings ahead of Valentine's Day from couples looking to spend time together.

She said the research showed what Spicers already knew, that guests valued experiences, not things.

"The research shows that more than half of Australians (53%) classify quality times as a nature escape away from the stresses of the city, and almost a third (31%) just want a night away without the kids, which is exactly what we aim to provide at our Retreats."



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