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ASK THE QUESTION: Transport and Main Roads launches ‘memories’ campaign to ask Queenslanders what their Christmas will be remembered for this year. Don’t let it be the image on the right.
ASK THE QUESTION: Transport and Main Roads launches ‘memories’ campaign to ask Queenslanders what their Christmas will be remembered for this year. Don’t let it be the image on the right.

How will you remember this Christmas?

"THERE is no excuse for making bad decisions when you're behind the wheel."  

That's the message to motorists from Road Safety Minister Mark Bailey as we enter the busiest time of year on Queensland roads.   

More cars, more tourists and more distractions over the Christmas holiday period can be a recipe for disaster.   

Mr Bailey said it was up to everyone to ensure the festive season remained exactly that - a time to celebrate with family and friends.   

"This can be a dangerous time on our roads, so we're asking people to commit to road safety so we can all remember this time of year for the right reasons," he said.   

"If people decide to take risks; get behind the wheel after a few drinks, not wear a seatbelt or look at their phone while driving, it will lead to tragedy."  

His messages come as the Department of Transport and Main Roads launches its 'memories' campaign, asking Queenslanders what they'd like these holidays to be remembered for.   

"We want a repeat of this year's Easter long weekend where there were no fatalities," Mr Bailey said.   

During last year's holiday period from December 9 - January 27 there were 33 fatalities and more than 2000 people injured in traffic crashes.  

That's up on 2014 where 22 people were killed and 1649 people injured.   

Mr Bailey said it was time to go back to basics - wear a seatbelt, stick to the speed limit, don't use your phone while driving, don't drive tired and don't drive under the influence. Simple.   

Deputy Commissioner Steve Gollschewski warned motorists police would be out in force.  

"No matter where you are in Queensland, there will be an increased police presence on the road networks with officers particularly targeting impaired driving and speeding," he said. 

"We'll be rolling out a series of intelligence-driven traffic operations such as random driver testing for alcohol and drugs and speed enforcement on roads and highways in key high-risk areas."  

The facts

  • 93% of Queensland drivers speed at least some of the time and 48% speed on most trips. 
  • 63% of drivers reach for their phone at least some of the time. More than a quarter of drivers (26%) use their mobile phone on most trips, rising to 55% of young drivers.
  • Young drivers engage in risky behaviours on the road in far greater numbers than the general population. 
  • 24% of motorists drive when they are, or may be, under the influence of drugs or over the legal alcohol limit.
  • Fatigue continues to be a significant issue for drivers with up to 40% claiming to drive tired at least some of the time. 
  • Up to 8% of drivers don't wear a seat belt when driving on public roads.
  • In 2015, 33 people were killed and 2000 injured from December 9 - January 27. 

Statistics: Risky Behaviours, Driver Segmentation Research (Footprints Research, Nov 2016) and QPS.