Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey has pledged to deliver millions of dollars to improve cycling safety in Queensland.
Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey has pledged to deliver millions of dollars to improve cycling safety in Queensland. Warren Lynam

'We all deserve to feel safe': Minister's safety pledge

IN THE wake of cycling safety advocate Cameron Frewer's death, Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey has pledged to invest millions of dollars into infrastructure and bike riding culture to improve road safety.

"We all deserve to feel safe on the road and we need cooperation from both bike riders and motorists to make this a reality," Minister Bailey said.

"Since we introduced the minimum passing distance rule, we have been used road safety campaigns under TMR's Join The Drive initiative to communicate and educate Queenslanders on the rule, and sharing the roads with bike riders in general."

Minister Bailey said bike riders were some of the most vulnerable road users, so motorists should give them as much space as was safely possible.

"It's always desirable to separate cyclists and pedestrians from vehicles where possible and we do this by building dedicated bike and shared paths," he said.

The Palaszczuk Government will invest over $67.5 million into the design and construction of high-priority bike riding infrastructure across Queensland this financial year, and invest $240 million over four years to boost Queensland's bike riding culture.

"Our aim is to eventually remove the interaction between bike riders and vehicles entirely, but until then, initiatives like the minimum passing distance rule are one of the ways to help keep bike riders safe on the roads," Minister Bailey said.

 

Cameron Frewer was killed on November 5 when he was hit by a car while cycling on Caloundra Rd.
Cameron Frewer was killed on November 5 when he was hit by a car while cycling on Caloundra Rd. John McCutcheon

Mr Frewer's death has sparked a fierce online debate about road rules, with many saying cyclists "shouldn't be on the road".

But Minister Bailey said any road user who placed themselves on one side of the debate needed to "think hard about what they are saying".

"No one owns the road or has any more rights than others to be there," he said.

"The consequences of that kind of thinking can be deadly and has no place on our roads.

"The vast majority of drivers and riders do the right thing and behave with respect on Queensland roads.

"Unfortunately, it only takes a few seconds and one error of judgement to change the lives of so many people.

"Cameron's tragic death has reminded us of that."

The Safer Roads, Safer Queensland steering committee, of which Bicycle Queensland is a member, also advises the Government on immediate and mid-term actions to help reduce road trauma on Queensland roads and has met on an as-needs basis since 2015.

The steering committee is chaired by TMR and includes organisations like the Queensland Police Service, RACQ, Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety - Queensland, Motorcycle Riders Association of Queensland and the Queensland Trucking Association.



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