War on waste gave me food for thought

THE TV series War on Waste was an eye-opener.

Carrots which were too big were dumped as were mountains of bananas because they were kinky instead of curved and loads of plastic by the truckload was going into the oceans.

The news the other night showed mountains of perfect pineapples rotting in paddocks.

The carrots could be sliced and diced to size and put into packets of frozen vegies.

And we could sell the kinky bananas in the supermarkets; the kinks would disappear as we ate them.

Why not flavour our treats with fruit to replace the chemicals.

We could start with bananas and pineapples.

Basically, all fruits and vegies are too expensive.

Apparently, less than 10 per cent of us eat fruits and vegies.

We all know of diabetes and cancers and arthritis and more western society diseases.

Would it be reasonable to say we're a sick society and more than 90 per cent of us don't have an immune system? Could it be the 90 per cent who are not eating fruits and vegies who are sick?

Why not ask the marketers to be less greedy and lower the cost of fruits and vegies and to sell the too-big and the kinky and the misshaped foods at affordable prices.

Would it not be the truth to say our immune systems would be strengthened and there would be a decrease in diseases if there was an increase in the fruits and vegies we eat?

Would more than 10 per cent of us be healthy?

Could we have food instead of flu and vaccinations?

Is this a brain opener?

BARRY BEETHAM

Ipswich



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