DIG IT: Melanie Ryan from the International River Foundation (left), Phil Smith (rear) from the Bremer River Fund and Darren Moore from Thiess Services, were part of a large group of staff and volunteers working on the bank of the Bundamba Creek at Tite Family Park.
DIG IT: Melanie Ryan from the International River Foundation (left), Phil Smith (rear) from the Bremer River Fund and Darren Moore from Thiess Services, were part of a large group of staff and volunteers working on the bank of the Bundamba Creek at Tite Family Park. David Nielsen

Thiess workers help plant native trees at Bundamba Creek

Thiess staff (from left) Quentin Hackett, Jon Manava, and Mick Hawkins. David Nielsen

THINK globally, act locally, get a little dirt on your hands.

It's not often employers can get their staff to use their day off to do volunteer work but that's what Thiess workers did yesterday.

As part of their company culture of contributing at the global level and also locally, the workers spent the day with volunteers planting native trees and grasses to help stabilise Bundamba Creek's banks and provide habitat for wildlife.

The Thiess workers and volunteers were in Tite Family Park in North Booval.

Thiess machinery was also put to work removing debris deposited in the creek by recent floods.

Thiess Services environment manager Darren Moore said it was an initiative that had been going for a couple of years now.

"It's basically to rehabilitate this river catchment; this creek system flows into the Bremer River," Mr Moore said.

"Because of the pressures of urbanisation, it's got a history of sedimentation - basically silt build-up - and creating issues for the flora and fauna in this region and more importantly the Bremer River catchment.

"It causes all sorts of issues for the aquatic life in particular."

The Bremer River Fund, in conjunction with the Ipswich City Council and the International River Foundation have been rehabilitating this area over the past couple of years.

"Thiess is a major sponsor of the International River Foundation so we've put our crews to work for this day as part of that broader initiative over the last couple of years," Mr Moore said.

"It will continue of for many more months and maybe even years all the way through to where it joins up with the Bremer River.

"We're planting species native to the area; basically replicating the species that are fully-grown in this area."

Phil Smith from the Bremer River Fund said a recent council study found about 14 different species of fish in the creek.

"We've also got quite a bit of bird life along here as well," Mr Smith said.

"The creek itself acts as a bit of a corridor so the birds and animals can move in and out of the river and up.

"We're trying to raise the profile and let people know it's a nice place to be and we're really grateful to Thiess for being part of that."

Mel Ryan from the International River Foundation said the foundation works with a lot of big companies to do volunteering and community engagement activities.

"With a company like Thiess, they do have the equipment and machinery as well as people with other professional skills, like environment officers," Ms Ryan said.

"These kind of things need professional skills as well as man hours.

"We kind of co-ordinate the activities in conjunction with Ipswich City Council."



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