Tributes for lovable larrikin Steve Jones

TRIBUTES have poured in for Lockyer Valley Mayor Steve Jones after a massive stroke felled the popular civic leader.

Cr Jones was in a critical but stable condition last night at Princess Alexandra Hospital's intensive care unit.

But there were grave fears held for him at the time of going to press.

The community took to social media on Friday to throw their support behind the larger-than-life veteran leader.

Many expressed their shock at learning Cr Jones was fighting for life in hospital - inundating the council's Facebook page with well wishes and prayers.

"Keep fighting Steve, like you have always fought for all of us in the Lockyer Valley," said Catherine Bull.

"You are a fighter Steve . . . you have shown this to the Lockyer Valley in the past, now do this for you and your family," said Kay Brock.

Fellow councillor and long-term friend Derek Pingle said the whole situation was a tragedy.

He said it had been a very surreal 48 hours for him personally.

"Something like this makes you realise how fragile your own mortality is," he said.

"I have admired Steve for a very long time and I have had the privilege of working alongside him for the past four years.

"People are absolutely devastated . . . they are shocked and cannot comprehend life without him at the helm."

A Lockyer Valley Regional Council spokesman extended the organisation's sincerest and most heartfelt wishes.

"The well wishes and messages of support from the community have been overwhelming and we thank everybody for their kind words," he said.

"Council would like to recognise the wishes of the family and respect their privacy during this time.

The spokesman said Deputy Mayor Tanya Milligan would represent the mayor's office until further notice.

 

There are two types of stroke

The Australian Stroke Foundation says a stroke can happen in two ways.

Either there is a blood clot or plaque that blocks a blood vessel in the brain or a blood vessel in the brain breaks or ruptures.

A stroke caused by a blood clot is called an ischaemic stroke and those caused by a break in the wall of a blood vessel in the brain are called haemorrhagic strokes.

About four out of every five strokes are ischaemic.  

The foundation says every stroke is different and each person who suffered a stroke will have different problems and different needs.   

The way a person may be affected depends on where in the brain the stroke happens and how big the stroke is.   

A stroke on the right side of the brain generally causes problems on the left side of the body.  

A stroke on the left side of the brain causes problems on the right side of the body.   

Some strokes happen at the base of the brain and can cause problems with eating, breathing and moving. 

For more details, visit strokefoundation.com.au



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