There's been a rise in domestic violence over the past two years, with top cop struggling to understand the murders of Hannah Clarke and her children. 
There's been a rise in domestic violence over the past two years, with top cop struggling to understand the murders of Hannah Clarke and her children. 

Top cop remembers Hannah Clarke as DV offences surge

Commissioner Katarina Carroll says she struggles to comprehend the death of Hannah Clarke and her children a year after her death, after revealing domestic violence offences are still increasing in Queensland. 

Ms Clarke, a 31-year-old fitness professional, and her children Trey, 3, Aaliyah, 6, and Laianah, 4, were set on fire by Rowan Baxter in Raven St, Camp Hill, on February 19 last year. Baxter killed himself.

"I'm reaching out to the family and going to Hannah's place to lay some flowers over the next few days," Ms Carroll said today of the anniversary.

 

Rowan Baxter and Hannah Clarke with their children Laianah, Aaliyah and Trey. Photo: Facebook
Rowan Baxter and Hannah Clarke with their children Laianah, Aaliyah and Trey. Photo: Facebook

"The message is if you need our assistance, please call out, we will be there.

"Hold each other dear, my heart goes out to Sue and Lloyd and to that family.

"They are the most amazing family and the tragedy they have been through is so difficult to comprehend even a year on. Let's learn from everything that we can and get better at protecting our victims."

Ms Carroll said the increase in domestic violence incidents in Queensland in the last two years had been phenomenal.

"We've got from 93,000 to 100,000 incidents now to 107,000," Ms Carroll said.

"An increase of some 6000-7000 (incidents) a year.

"In some ways that gives me high confidence that we are having a public conversation, that we are reporting more, that we are out there just discussing the issues."

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll
Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll

Ms Carroll said police had introduced new initiatives in the past year.

"The online reporting, Operation Sierra Alessa, is where we literally go out to our high-risk offenders and hold them to account," she said.

"We are looking at coercive control legislation into the future. Everyone across government, across community, are really calling this scourge out and dealing with it a lot better into the future."

As part of Operation Alessa police have visited the state's 300 worst repeat domestic violence offenders to break the chronic cycle of offending.

Officers targeted 319 people with three or more domestic violence orders, including one who had seven orders with different partners.

Originally published as Top cop remembers Hannah as DV offences surge



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