Catching dental health issues early can save the health system a lot of money down the track.
Catching dental health issues early can save the health system a lot of money down the track. Srisakorn

The tooth hurts as poverty harms Ipswich locals' health

POVERTY is pushing Ipswich residents further away from healthcare, with tens of thousands of locals unable to pay for the basics including dental, scripts and doctor visits.

Special NewsRegional analysis of federal health data shows 40,642 - 26.7 per cent - of local adults were unable to pay for basic dental treatment in the 2016-17 financial year.

The research also shows about 14,917 - 9.8 per cent - of locals could not afford to have their medical prescriptions filled during the 12 months.

About 4.2 per cent of Ipswich residents reported not seeing a GP because of cost and the average out-of-pocket expense was $9-$35.

The Australian Medical Association's Dr Sandra Hirowatari said health poverty was widespread.

"For example, one of my diabetic patients purchased both the medication and the needed glucose monitoring machine," the chair of the AMA council's regional and rural doctors committee said.  

"But for her to follow my prescribed treatment, she had to go hungry (to pay for the medicine and machine)."

Australian Dental Association president Dr Hugo Sachs said the situation was compounded by the often lengthy wait to access government-funded dentistry clinics.

Dr Sachs said lifelong impacts could flow from not having routine oral care - including the possibility of certain cancers.

'There is an opportunity here for governments to reduce waiting lists by increasing funding," Dr Sachs said.

"Going without dental care can lead to significant problems for the patient and this will increase the cost on the health system."

Pharmacy Guild of Australia's Greg Turnbull said he was not surprised people were unable to pay for scripts.

"It is something that should concern health policymakers," the PGA communications director said.

Queensland Council of Social Services CEO Mark Henley said medical poverty was not being adequately addressed by governments.

"There is absolutely no doubt that there needs to be greater investment in health services, particularly in regional areas," Mr Henley said.

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt's spokesman said an expert committee was examining medical costs and the government's plan to encourage more trainee doctors to move to regional areas would help in the long run.

 

Health insurance is not a priority for many in our region.
Health insurance is not a priority for many in our region. courtneyk

Half of us cannot afford health insurance

ALMOST half of Ipswich locals do not have health insurance.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data shows our region has one of the lowest uptakes of health insurance in the country, with just 83,263 - 54.7 per cent - insured.

Private Healthcare Australia CEO Dr Rachel David said a lack of private medical providers in regional areas and the cost of insurance were behind the low take-up of health insurance.

"Most people take out health insurance because they want access to surgery on time, access to mental health services and to subsidised dental care," she said.

"Wages haven't really risen since 2009 but health inflation - that is the cost of meeting claims or services - has been rising about 5-6 per cent a year."

Queensland Council of Social Services CEO Mark Henley said most Australians could not afford health insurance.

"Research shows about 63 per cent of families experienced financial difficulty in the past 12 months," Mr Henley said.

"People across the state are having to make compromising decisions on paying their power bills, rent or to put food on their table.

"They are struggling just to pay for the essentials and health insurance is not considered by these people as an essential."

The Federal Government expects to roll out legislation allowing policyholders to claim travel and accommodation related to hospitalisation.

"Our private health insurance reforms mean policies will be simplified and more easily understood so consumers get a clear picture on what is included in their policy," a spokesman for Health Minister Greg Hunt said.

 

Poverty is pushing our region's residents further away from healthcare, with locals unable to pay for the basics including dental, scripts and doctor visits.
Poverty is pushing our region's residents further away from healthcare, with locals unable to pay for the basics including dental, scripts and doctor visits. AndreyPopov

We are happy with our doctors

IPSWICH residents have given local GPs their stamp of approval, with 96.8 per cent of locals saying their doctors treated them with respect. 

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data reveals 40.9 per cent of locals saw a dentist in the 2016-17 financial year and 81 per cent had a GP appointment.

About nine in 10 (93.8 per cent) of locals said their medical practitioner listened to their concerns and 93.4 per cent believed their GP spent enough time with them.  - NewsRegional

BY THE NUMBERS

Ipswich health statistics:

Per cent adults who had dental treatment: 40.9

Per cent adults who saw a GP: 81

Per cent who did not fill a script due to cost: 9.8

Per cent who did not see GP due to cost: 4.2

Per cent who did not see dentist due to cost: 26.7

Per cent with private health insurance: 54.7

Per cent who felt their GP listened: 93.8

Per cent who felt their GP respected them: 96.8

Per cent who had enough time with GP: 93.4

Average out-of-pocket GP expenses: $9-$35

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare:

News Corp Australia


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