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The biggest, easiest science project right in your backyard

A Double Barred Finch.
A Double Barred Finch.

IF YOU love birds and science then the Aussie Backyard Bird Count is an event you do not want to miss.

The annual event sees people from all over Australia count birds they see in their backyards over a 20-minute period and the data collected goes towards assisting BirdLife Australia to understand more about the birds that live where people live.

This year's event will run in conjunction with National Bird Week from October 23-29 which originally started in the early 1900s by the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union.

BirdLife Australia as they are now known organises and promotes Bird Week hoping to inspire Australians to take action and get involved in bird conservation efforts. 

Springfield Lakes Nature Care Group will host the Greater Springfield version of the event and president Luise Manning said it was a great opportunity to learn more about wildlife right in your backyard.

"It's the biggest & easiest science project you can do and you can do it each day if you like, for example during your morning walk or while taking the kids to the park,” Mrs Manning said.

"If walking, you can start your 20-minute count from a central point so that the birds counted are within a maximum 80m radius or in an area of approximately 100m x 200m, so something like the start of the Spring Lake pontoon to the return as you are remaining in the same area.

"Another idea is sitting in your backyard with a coffee, you can record what you see and can record only the highest number of individual birds of each species that you see together at any one time. For example, three magpies might pop into the garden, head next door and then two come back again - that is three birds, not five.

"You can get the kids involved as well as you walk home from school or around the oval, who knows what you might find!  

"Double Barred finches are very cute and look like miniature owls and are frequent visitors to parks and gardens and make their home near water- some can be found along Regatta Lake.” 

Mrs Manning said participants should invest in a good pair of binoculars to help spot the birds and if you're not sure of the bird's name, you can check out your local library and see if they have a copy of Australian Birds by Donald & Molly Trounson or use the BirdLife mobile phone app which can be found on the aussiebirdcount website. 

To find our more information or to register visit https://aussiebirdcount.org.au/ aussiebirdcount.org.au or follow the Springfield Lakes Nature Care Inc Facebook page.

Topics:  aussie bird count bird conservation birdlife australia national bird week springfield lakes nature care inc



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