Teen in jail over breaches

A TEEN will remain in custody at a detention centre after snubbing the sentence conditions imposed by the Children's Court and who went on to commit more offences.

Now aged 17, the youth appeared in the dock of the Children's Court before Judge Dennis Lynch QC for resentencing after breaching his prior sentence by non-compliance with his penalties.

The Ipswich youth had gone before a judge in February and was granted a conditional release order, which he breached.

Judge Lynch said he was sentenced in August 2015 on two counts of armed robbery in company; and one count of attempted robbery.

He received two years' probation and was ordered to complete 70 hours of unpaid community service.

He was returned to court in November 2017 for breaching the probation and was given the opportunity to comply with court orders.

The court heard he had breached a six-month detention order that was suspended under the Youth Justices Act.

Judge Lynch said the youth was on a train with six people and created a disturbance.

He then followed two people, aged 26 and 30, off the train.

The teen and two others picked up lengths of pipe and hit them on the ground before holding the piping aloft as if to hit the pair.

The robbery attempt was interrupted and they fled.

Judge Lynch said the youth had ignored previous warnings.

"It's disappointing," he said.

"You are 17 and six months and accumulated a great many convictions.

"When you turn 18, the consequences for you will be much more serious."

Judge Lynch revoked the original conditional release order and reduced the period of detention to two months under the Youth Justices Act.

He must complete 70 per cent before being eligible for release under a supervised order.



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