Tattoos: a rite of passage

ONCE reserved for social outcasts, getting a tattoo has become a rite of passage, according to Ipswich tattooist Ron Syle.

The owner of Ron's Tattoo Emporium and Body Piercing said in his experience, once people hit 18 they saw a tattoo as a way of marking adulthood.

“We have a lot come in once they get to 17 and a half and it is still against the law,” Mr Syle said.

A recent McCrindle Research study revealed 'getting inked' was an ideal way to mark coming of age.

The study polled 1300 Australians and showed while growing up as part of Generation X - those born between 1961 to 1981 - meant moving out of home at 22, for Generation Y - those born between 1982 to 2001- it meant getting a tattoo.

Ron's Tattoo Emporium tattooist Kate Newton said a tattoo was also a way people marked a significant time in their lives, such as turning 18.

For her, the Jacaranda tattoo on her left arm was done in memory of her mother.

“We have customers of all ages, everyone from 18 to the oldest I have had a lady of 65,” she said.

“She's been back twice since.

“We even had one woman who came in for a divorce tattoo, which had the word freedom and a date.

“Kids' names are a big one.”



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