Ipswich Tenpin owner Dean Margiolas closed the business after being evicted from its flood damaged property at Bundamba in 2011.
Ipswich Tenpin owner Dean Margiolas closed the business after being evicted from its flood damaged property at Bundamba in 2011. Claudia Baxter

City's long-awaited bowling alley a step closer to reality

THE sound of crashing pins could again return to Ipswich, with Mayor Andrew Antoniolli confirming the council was in discussions to build a bowling alley.  

Ipswich Tenpin in Bundamba closed after the 2011 floods, making AMF Richlands the closest bowling alley for the region's players.  

When questioned by a resident about the potential of incorporating an alley in the mall redevelopment, Cr Antoniolli confirmed talks were ongoing.  

"We have been in discussions with several groups about the possibility of a bowling facility," he wrote.   

"This will ultimately come down to reaching a commercial agreement between all parties that is beneficial to the city."

 In 2016, former mayor Paul Pisasale said attracting a bowling alley to Ipswich was "one of his top priorities".  

Mr Pisasale said he had spoken with a number of interested parties for three years including developers and the Tenpin Bowling Association of Queensland.  

He said the council had also been in constant talks with AMF.  

Nothing eventuated from Mr Pisasale's efforts, but Cr Antoniolli might have more success. 

Debra and David Buttner, owners of Skateaway Bundamba, during the floods. Skateaway was located in the same building as Ipswich Tenpin.
Debra and David Buttner, owners of Skateaway Bundamba, during the floods. Skateaway was located in the same building as Ipswich Tenpin. David Nielsen

Last year 97 per cent of people who voted in a Queensland Times poll were in favour of an alley returning to the city. 

 "We're talking to some people who are interested in bringing a bowling alley to the CBD," he said.   

But if a tenpin facility is established in the city, do not expect stiff competition on the lane with the mayor.  

"The last time I bowled was at one of my kids' birthday parties," he said.   

The search for a suitable building failed and the estimated cost of building a new one was between $5 million and $7 million.  

Tenpin Bowling Association of Queensland chief executive Gail Torrens was hopeful a facility could return to Ipswich. 

"It would be fantastic to have a tenpin sport and recreation venue in Ipswich," she said. 

"We are always searching for support towards this outcome."

Ms Torrens confirmed the association had several meetings with state and local governments in the past and also attempted to secure support from developers.  

She said returning a bowling alley to Ipswich would enhance the quality of life for many residents.   

"Our sport provides services to enrich the lives of the Ipswich community through keeping healthy and active; either through fun recreational or equally-engaging sport activity," she said.  

"Ipswich persons with a disability had a sport with no barriers to participation and families had a meeting point and activity that all ages could participate together from two to 80 years old."  

Ms Torrens said she would watch with anticipation.  



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