FACE OF CONCERN: Australian cricketer David Warner has been suspended for an alleged attack on English player Joe Root.
FACE OF CONCERN: Australian cricketer David Warner has been suspended for an alleged attack on English player Joe Root. Getty Images

Stars need to tackle issues

JAMES Tamou admits he is in no position to argue with his $50,000 fine for drink and unlicensed driving.

David Warner has put his hand up and apologised while Kurtley Beale has reconnected with himself.

Watching yesterday's morning sports news was like being a fly on the wall of the confessional box, such were the tales of remorse and contrition from three of sports' more recent sinners.

There was no "the devil made me do it", fortunately.

On the surface, it seems Warner needs to develop a thicker skin.

The incident that led him to abuse two senior Australian journalists recently did not remotely warrant his vitriol-laden response on Twitter.

Punching Joe Root for wearing a wig as a beard on behalf of South Africa's Hashim Amla further indicates a distinct lack of perspective. Which is hardly surprising, given the cocooned existence young sports stars have.

Combine that with alcohol and a few "personal issues" and it's a recipe for throwing punches, in the case of Beale and Warner.

Tamou didn't try to harm anyone else but his actions were of a much greater danger to others.

Some people are saying Warner had ruined his chances of captaining his country.

On the contrary I'd say. He's following the lead of Ricky Ponting, who was knocked out in a Kings Cross pub in an incident that allegedly included a transvestite.

Ponting overcame his issues to rise to the second highest post in the country so there is hope for Warner yet.

I've been to the Walkabout pub at Birmingham and it's not a transvestite haunt (as far as I'm aware), so maybe Root with a wig was as near as Warner could find.

Ponting overcame his issues to rise to the second highest post in the country so there is hope for Warner yet. Unlike Ponting, he hasn't admitted alcohol was part of the problem.

Beale, too, tried to hold out the line that he didn't have a drinking problem.

Denial serves a strong purpose in the human brain. It shelters us from harsh reality, but it also prevents us overcoming the issues that cause the problems Beale kept repeating.

How do I know?

Let's just say that if I was a high-profile sporting person, I would have been booted off the team long ago. I know well the familiar feelings of regret as the recollection of the previous night's booze-fuelled atrocities slowly seep back into the sozzled mind.

It is only when you openly address your issues by examining your inner self and admitting to them that you begin to conquer your demons.

But it is a lifetime's work.

It's not a button you switch off and it stays off without regular maintenance.

Beale has made the first step, admitting himself into a treatment clinic and admitting he has a problem with alcohol.

The sooner Warner honestly admits to his own problems the better.



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