Recycling bins waiting for collection at The Circle, Robelle Domain, Springfield Central. IMAGE: Patria Jannides
Recycling bins waiting for collection at The Circle, Robelle Domain, Springfield Central. IMAGE: Patria Jannides

Springfield student puts ‘wishy-washy’ council on notice

IT was a tumultuous 48 hours for Ipswich residents last week when the council sensationally announced it would send all residential recycling to landfill before backflipping on the decision.

It hoped to secure a short-term contractor to take the city's recycling this week.

Springfield Lakes 18-year-old Tahlia Casson (pictured) said it would be a victory for "common sense".

The environmental science student accumulated nearly 2000 signatures in 24 hours opposing the recycling freeze, and she said she would hold onto them in case the "wishy-washy" council changed its mind again.

Springfield Lakes environmental science student Tahlia Casson, 18.
Springfield Lakes environmental science student Tahlia Casson, 18.

"This was a really good wake-up call for all of Ipswich to get their recycling right," the eighteen-year-old said.

Ipswich City Council had partially blamed high contamination rates for their decision to send recycling to landfill. It said more than 50 per cent of items currently placed in Ipswich yellow-top bins was not recyclable.

China's restriction on the salvageable contents it would accept also played a part.

"At work on Saturday we were all talking and some people didn't even realise our recycling went to China," Miss Casson said.

"It's reassuring that these discussion are happening now, and that people will hopefully be more aware of what can and can't go into their yellow bins."

She hoped the council was now considering methods to ensure another recycling freeze was not on the horizon.

"Ultimately (sending recycling to landfill) is not going to affect the people who will make that decision," Ms Casson said.

"It's going to affect (young adults) like me and our children in the future when they run out of space in landfill."

"(The council) needed to know we weren't happy about their initial decision, and that they were going to ruin what we would have to preserve for our children and following generations."

In an open letter on Ipswich's waste management, Mayor Andrew Antoniolli said the city's new techniques and methodologies might include a refined recycling program.

"They will almost certainly include a tender process which we hope will lead to this city becoming a leader in waste-to-energy research, development and delivery," he said.



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