WARM WELCOME: ABC breakfast radio presenter Spencer Howson with USQ students Conor O’Loghlin, Rachel Tapscott, Dylan Woodland and Grant Snodgrass.
WARM WELCOME: ABC breakfast radio presenter Spencer Howson with USQ students Conor O’Loghlin, Rachel Tapscott, Dylan Woodland and Grant Snodgrass. Contributed

ABC's Spencer shows USQ's radio students the ropes

ONE of the country's most respected radio announcers stopped by the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) recently to share his expertise with USQ students.

ABC breakfast radio presenter Spencer Howson visited USQ Springfield to participate in the University's 2015 Research Week.

Mr Howson met a group of Creative Arts (Film, TV & Radio) students, who learn digital audio production and radio broadcasting as part of their course work.

He spoke about career opportunities in radio and what it takes to get a foot in the door in the industry.

In addition to sharing his knowledge, Mr Howson said there was another reason behind his visit.

"I love looking for future radio broadcasters and producers because the ABC is constantly in need of casual producers, he said.

"I see a lot of potential here and the ABC wants to make sure it gives opportunities to the absolute best."

A long-time fan of USQ's student-run radio station Phoenix Radio, Mr Howson was impressed by what he saw during his first tour of USQ Springfield's new media centre.

He believed any student with access to industry-standard facilities would increase their chances of finding work once they graduated.

"There's no doubt USQ has some cutting edge equipment and these students couldn't be given a better opportunity to develop their skills," Mr Howson said.

"What the ABC is always excited about is anyone who has worked on radio programs.

"These students are programming radio shows every day and USQ is training students to work at a place like ABC radio or any other radio station."

USQ broadcast lecturer Ashley Jones said Mr Howson aimed to leave students with the confidence that, through hard work, dedication and eagerness, they could develop a successful career in radio.

"This was a very beneficial visit for our students as they were given valuable advice and practical information from someone who has been in the radio broadcast industry for 25 years," Mr Jones said.

"For students nearing the end of their course, Mr Howson's tips on how to break into the radio industry were particularly encouraging and thoroughly insightful into what goes on behind the scenes at a radio station."



Subbies target Turnbull over $15b payment ripoff

premium_icon Subbies target Turnbull over $15b payment ripoff

Why building subbies aim to target marginal seats

We don’t need to encourage more bludgers

premium_icon We don’t need to encourage more bludgers

50 retirement funds to be looted by Labor to fund welfare handouts

HIGH ALERT: 20 fires burn across the state

HIGH ALERT: 20 fires burn across the state

FIRE crews are on standby as 20 blazes burn around Queensland.

Local Partners