SOPHIE’S LAW: The perfectly formed fingers of stillborn Sophie Ella Milosevic, who was killed in a car crash a week before she was due to be born.
SOPHIE’S LAW: The perfectly formed fingers of stillborn Sophie Ella Milosevic, who was killed in a car crash a week before she was due to be born. SUPPLIED

Sophia's law a battle to protect unborn

IT HAS been 18 months since Sarah and Peter Milosevic lost their unborn daughter Sophie in a car crash.

Ms Milosevic was 39 weeks pregnant. Because Sophie was yet to take a breath, she had no legal rights as a human being.

This meant Rodney Shaw, the drunk driver who ploughed into the couple's car, was not charged over her death.

Instead he was fined $950 and had his driver's licence suspended for five months.

The ruling was a devastating blow to the grieving parents.

They now want the law changed to protect the rights of unborn babies killed in road crashes.

If introduced, Sophie's Law could see charges brought against drivers that cause the death of a fetus at 30 weeks gestation or more.

On January 4, the Milosevic's launched an online petition for the introduction of Sophie's Law. Within four weeks it attracted more than 113 000 signatures.

The petition was presented to the Attorney-General Yvette D'Ath in a meeting held on February 4.

While Ms D'Ath has not yet made a statement on the matter, Ms Milosevic said she was confident Ms D'Ath would take it to parliament.

"She expressed compassion and a preparedness to co-operate with us on the matter," Ms Milosevic said.

Sophie's Law has since attracted the attention of a number of federal and state representatives, as well as interstate politicians.

The couple is due to meet with Queensland Senator Glenn Lazarus to discuss the matter.

With Sophie's Law now with the Attorney-General, Ms Milosevic encouraged people to continue signing the online petition.

"The fight is not yet over. We need to keep pushing until the laws are changed," she said.

"This is about breaking the silence of stillbirth and giving all those babies whose lives have been lost a voice.

"Before I found myself in this world of loss, I had no idea how prevalent it was, how many women have experienced stillbirth.

"That's because there are no statistics. When an unborn baby is killed in the womb, there's no coroner involved.

"They simply don't count.

"They don't have a voice, they don't have a say, and we won't give up on this until they do."



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