Paul Kinnane shows where shopping trolleys have been hurled from the top of David Trumpy Bridge onto the walkway below.
Paul Kinnane shows where shopping trolleys have been hurled from the top of David Trumpy Bridge onto the walkway below.

‘Someone will be killed’: Jogger’s plea on death drop

SOMEONE’S idea of a cheap laugh could end up costing a life, according to Ipswich man Paul Kinnane.

Mr Kinnane has been complaining for months about the ease at which people can hurl shopping trolleys from David Trumpy Bridge, down onto the Riverheart boardwalk about 20m below.

On several occasions since late last year, Mr Kinnane has noticed piles of smashed up and twisted trolleys on the boardwalk, with divots left behind in the timber where they landed.

Despite lodging several complaints with Ipswich City Council, Mr Kinnane said he was yet to see any real action to prevent a possible tragedy.

Ipswich man Paul Kinnane was shocked to find evidence of people throwing trolleys from David Trumpy Bridge onto the boardwalk at the Riverheart Parklands again on Monday.
Ipswich man Paul Kinnane was shocked to find evidence of people throwing trolleys from David Trumpy Bridge onto the boardwalk at the Riverheart Parklands again on Monday.

The latest incident was reported after Mr Kinnane noticed more wrecked trolleys on the boardwalk about 6am Monday.

“I first complained to council a long time ago,” he said.

“They say they will look into it and we’ll get back to you but I am yet to see any action.

“If these trolleys fall on an unsuspecting pedestrian they will be killed.”

Mr Kinnane has called for highway overpass-style fencing to prevent heavy objects being hurled off the bridge.

He says low tide exposes the extent of the problem, with shopping trolleys lining the banks of the Bremer near both the Trumpy and Bradfield bridges.

Paul Kinnane shows the spot where trolley hurled from the David Trumpy Bridge have landed on the Riverheart boardwalk.
Paul Kinnane shows the spot where trolley hurled from the David Trumpy Bridge have landed on the Riverheart boardwalk.

Ipswich police station officer in charge acting Senior Sergeant Bill Wilkinson said he was not aware of the frequency of the incidents as reported by Mr Kinnane, although there had been at least two incidents reported in the past year.

The area is under Safe City CCTV monitoring but the Queensland Times was not told of any incidents being caught on camera, nor were we offered any footage of potential offenders.

Acting Sen. Sgt Wilkinson said there was a report of two juveniles throwing a trolley off the bridge on September 18 about 4pm.

Paul Kinnane shows the spot where trolley hurled from the David Trumpy Bridge have landed on the Riverheart boardwalk.
Paul Kinnane shows the spot where trolley hurled from the David Trumpy Bridge have landed on the Riverheart boardwalk.

On April 13, just after midnight, two juveniles loaded council bins onto shopping trolleys and threw the whole lot off the bridge and into the river below.

“Police respond to calls for service in this area, however the incidents of trolleys being thrown over the bridge have not been identified as an issue via these calls for service. We work with the community when issues are identified,” Sen. Sgt Wilkinson said.

Sen Sgt Wilkinson said that after speaking to the Queensland Times, he had instructed officers at the Riverlink police beat office to target the area.

An Ipswich City Council spokesman said although trolley dumping was a major problem in local waterways, there was very little the council could do to prevent it.

It is understood previous discussions about the issue involving the council, police and State Government did not produce any results.

Transport and Main Roads are responsible for erecting barriers or fences along the David Trumpy bridge, and the council says retailers also have a role to play.

“Retailers have a responsibility to ensure all shopping trolleys provided for customers remain within the retail premises,” the spokesman said.

“Council’s Compliance Branch manages complaints of abandoned trolleys and generally contacts the retailer directly in the first instance before proceeding to formal compliance intervention. Retailers usually respond promptly.”

Larger retailers are required to use a magnetic boundary to prevent the wheels of trolleys from turning once they leave the shopping centre, although this appears not to have completely solved the problem at Riverlink.



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