Beryl Johnston, The Queensland Times history columnist, is photographed in front of a portrait of her late grandfather, John Livingston Auld, who was a mine owner in the late 1800's in Ipswich.
Beryl Johnston, The Queensland Times history columnist, is photographed in front of a portrait of her late grandfather, John Livingston Auld, who was a mine owner in the late 1800's in Ipswich. Claudia Baxter

Times Past: Schools closed because of poor conditions

EARLY EDUCATION

The Primary School at North Ipswich was opened on July 1, 1867 by the General Inspector Mr MacDonnell.

It stood on an allotment of land granted by the Government and the school was designed by Mr Hart of the Railway Department.

The building (as it was at that time) cost 450 pounds, half of which was raised by subscription, the rest granted by the Government.

A dwelling house for the teacher would be erected when funds became available.

There were 26 children on the roll who were being taught by Mr Ewing. By September 1867 the enrolment had risen to 90.

 

MIDDLE IPSWICH SCHOOL

On September 1, 1875 the committee of the Church of England School, Brisbane St, and Ipswich handed the school over to Mr MacDonnell the representative of the Board of Education.

It then became a vested school with the Board of Education having control.

At the end of September it continued as a school for girls and infants only and became known as the Middle Ipswich School.

 

STORE BECOMES A SCHOOL

In late 1876 the store of Messrs J & G Harris situated at the corner of Bell and Bremer Sts Ipswich was vacant, so discussion took place regarding its future.

The store had originally cost 5,000 pounds to build and it was thought that it could be altered to suit school requirements for just 100 pounds.

Later Mr J G Anderson General Inspector of schools, Mr J Platt Inspector of schools in the West Moreton District and Mr F D Stanley Colonial Architect made an official visit to Ipswich to inspect the Harris store.

Finally in December 1876 the Education Department purchased the building and it became the National School for girls.

 

NOT FAVOURABLE

A report in 1872 stated that the Tivoli Provincial School was not favourable.

The school had on its roll 34 boys and 41 girls.

The material condition of the school was disgraceful to the inhabitants of the district it was claimed.

There was not sufficient room for so many children no shade anywhere only one toilet for the use of all the children and the two teachers, no clock and insufficient and unserviceable furniture.

 

NECESSARY CLASSES

An advertisement in the Queensland Times in 1880 advised the Ipswich public that "A few young men will be accepted in old Murphy's evening school at the Governor Cairns Hotel, Ipswich to improve their minds in reading, writing, arithmetic, practical geometry and the mensuration necessary for all practical purposes of life."

Hours of attendance from 7.30 until 11 nightly. Terms four shillings monthly in advance for readers and writers, for mensuration and practical geometry five shillings monthly in advance.

 

RE ELECTED

Re-elected to the presidency in 1892 of the West Moreton Teachers Association was Mr John Scott, Vice-president Mr P Bowler and Secretary Miss E Barker.

Other committee members were the Misses Wilson and Arnell; Mrs Fitzpatrick and Messrs Carey, McNamee and McNeill.

 

SPECIAL TRIBUTE

A former Ipswich Mayor Watson died on April 1, 1914.

At the time of his death he was living in Brisbane where he had been headmaster of the West End School.

A special tribute was made to Mayor Watson at a function in Queens Park Ipswich on May 3, 1914.

There were addresses by the Mayor Ald A T Stephenson, and other city dignitaries. The Vice-Regal Band played music which included the "Dead March"

 

FEMALES RATED NOT EQUAL TO MALE TEACHERS

An article in the Queensland Times of July 18, 1914 stated "There had been agitation in Victoria for equal pay for male and female teachers".

Mr Morrison the Public Service Commissioner said in his opinion, the services of women as teachers was not of equal value to those of men teachers.



Hospital slammed for exposing staff to virus risk

Premium Content Hospital slammed for exposing staff to virus risk

Ipswich Hospital under fire for “farcical” partial quarantine decisions

Exclusive: How Mongols are dodging strict bikie laws

Premium Content Exclusive: How Mongols are dodging strict bikie laws

Mongols OMCG members have started wearing NFL colours to get around tough bikie...

Ipswich cricket’s ‘sergeant general’ in 50 match milestone

Premium Content Ipswich cricket’s ‘sergeant general’ in 50 match milestone

Bichel’s valuable contribution to starting and expanding women’s program in...