Times Past with QT history columnist Beryl Johnston.
Times Past with QT history columnist Beryl Johnston. Claudia Baxter

Sloman put legacy in fine print

MR JOSIAH Bowring Sloman, the last of the original trio of partners of the Queensland Times, died on April 18, 1917. He was one of the oldest printers in Queensland.

Mr Sloman was proprietor of the Queensland Times for 16 years, during the most of which he resided at Tamar Cottage on Brisbane Rd, Booval.

Prior to his coming to Australia he had served articles of apprenticeship on the Plymouth Journal. In 1859 he set sail for Sydney in the ship La Hogue, arriving in October that year.

He left Sydney for Moreton Bay (as Queensland was then named) in November by the steamer Telegraph, the largest and fastest boat at that time, to take up a position on the North Australian at Ipswich, which was owned by Messrs E J and A C Bays, with Mr John Kent as editor.

In 1861 Messrs Bays sold the North Australian to Bishop O'Quinn.

NEWS MAN: J B Sloman was one of the oldest printers in Queensland.
NEWS MAN: J B Sloman was one of the oldest printers in Queensland. CONTRIBUTED

The first issue of this paper was published on October 8, 1861.

At that time the Queensland Times was published in lower Ellenborough St near the site of the railway overbridge and, owing to the resumption of the land by the government for railway purposes in connection with the deviation of the Ipswich and Toowoomba line via Sadliers Crossing, the office of the QT was transferred in 1874 to a position at the cnr Brisbane and Ellenborough Sts, which was known as Dowdens Corner.

On September 4, 1877, on account of his failing health, Mr J B Sloman sold his interest in the QT to Messrs A J Stephenson and William Kippen, who joined partnership with Mr Hugh Parkinson.

Following a trip to England, Sloman went to reside in Toowoomba, where he died.

While at Tamar Cottage Mr Sloman kept fruit and vegetable gardens and was a foundation member of the Ipswich and West Moreton Agricultural Society.

He was also one of the early members of the local Masonic society (English constitution).

 

 

GRANTHAM SCRUB

Tales of the early settlement of Grantham Scrub were recalled by Mrs John Roberts, one of the first settlers in that area. She was interviewed by a reporter from the Queensland Times in April 1928.

Mrs Roberts told of the settlement's early joys and trials.

She came to Queensland with her husband in 1884. For four years Mr Roberts was employed in the machinery section of the Queensland Woollen Manufacturing Company's mills beside the Bremer River in Ipswich.

In 1888 (c) Mr Roberts went to Grantham Scrub but getting to his selection of land proved difficult. He had to start clearing a path through the scrub so he could arrive at his destination.

When he finally came to his piece of land he built a slab hut on it. A month later Mrs Roberts joined her husband in a two-roomed humphy, which was still to have doors and windows fitted.

Neither of the Robertses had lived in the country before. He had been a colliery winder at Hanley and she, for 18 years before marriage, had been a "paintress" at Mintons, one of the world's famous potteries, at Stock-on-Trent.

Mrs Roberts spoke of the dingoes howling at night, which made her sick. She sometimes carried a large bag of flour from Gatton, while Mr Roberts carried a bag of sugar on his back.

There was little encouragement for production in the early days as butter sold for fourpence a pound and grocers paid threepence a dozen for large eggs.



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