Opinion

Allison used her last moments here to mark him a killer

Wednesday, July 16 front cover of The Queensland Times
Wednesday, July 16 front cover of The Queensland Times

LATE Monday afternoon I walked into the media room at the Brisbane Supreme Court with our court reporter Rae Wilson.

She had asked me to come over so I could see first hand where she had been covering the Baden-Clay murder trial from over the past six weeks.

The media room was located outside the courtroom where the trial had been under way. The court was closed at the time and the jury had gone home for the night, but there was still three young court reporters typing away.

Once more they were filing another story on one of the most followed court trials in Australian legal history.

As I walked from the media room, I asked the reporters if they were the jury, how would they find Gerard Baden-Clay.

Without hesitation, they answered in unison "guilty". Their opinion was that just one juror was holding out and that the majority were convinced of his guilt.

Their observation was probably right on the money because just three hours after resuming their deliberations, the jury filed back into court to condemn Baden-Clay to prison for at least the next 13 years.

There is no doubt the claw marks on his face was the most telling evidence against Baden-Clay.

His excuse that he had cut himself shaving was as unbelievable as his claim that he cared about and loved Allison. It was almost as though she had reached out from the grave to mark him as her killer.

You will note today as a tribute we changed our masthead to yellow ... it was Allison's favourite colour. 

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