Opinion

Sage and fun advice to get through life

I DON'T know if you have a mentor who you go to when you need some sound advice.

That person, who you can trust to cut through the emotion of any circumstance and give you clear guidance.

My mentor was my father and since his death I have missed that chance to get his understandings of issues large and small.

I openly admit I now have two former editors who I seek advice from when I am concerned that my decisions are not on the money.

One of these has a great turn of phrase and he continually surprises me with just how succinct his words are.

They remind me of these ponderings I was recently sent by another old journalist friend.

Thought you'd like to ponder over them as well.

  Good health is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die.

  Men have two emotions: hungry and horny, and they can't tell them apart. If you see a gleam in his eyes, make him a sandwich.

  Give a person a fish and you feed them for a day. Teach a person to use the Internet and they won't bother you for weeks, months, maybe years, unless they know your email address.

  Health nuts are going to feel stupid some day, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

  All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

  Life is like a jar of jalapeno peppers. What you do today might burn your backside tomorrow.

And as someone recently said to me: "Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long."

I am off for a short break now. Have a safe and fun Easter.

 

- Editor Peter Chapman



RSPCA to lay animal cruelty charges over puppy's injuries

Eight-month-old American Staffordshire bull terrier, Evie.

Eight-month-old pup's back legs were broken and left untreated

Rape, slut dances and exploitation: James Cook Uni vows review

James Cook University’s Cairns Campus. Picture: Marc McCormackSource:News Corp Australia

“At the moment [some] academics are untouchable.”

Why the NDIS should matter to all Ipswich locals

Little Lachlan (front) has an extremely rare genetic disorder that means he autism, cerebral palsy and epilepsy. He is one of thousands of Ipswich residents who will transition to the NDIS over the coming year. Pictured with his dad Robert Buhse, brother Quinlan, 4, and mum Zoe Cahill.

Lachlan's life depends on the NDIS

Local Partners