A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day.
A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day. Contributed

Heartbreaking photos of wallaby stuck in mud

THERE was a sad end to a gallant rescue effort on an Ipswich construction site this morning.

RSPCA officers and firefighters were called to a building site on Mt Juillerat Dve about 8am after workers noticed a wallaby stuck in mud up to its neck.

It was believed the wallaby was among a group of wallabies and kangaroos in the area that ventured into a fresh pile of mud that had recently been removed from the bottom of a nearby dam.

Unfortunately one adult male wallaby found a particularly sticky section too much to shake loose.

RSPCA humane advocate officer Chantelle Scolari said the wallaby could have been stuck in the mud for quite some time before being discovered.

"He was very stressed when we got there and he was still trying to dig himself out," Ms Scolari said.

"The mud was about hip deep for us and the wallaby's head and back were visible. He kept trying to stick his head under the mud which was a big concern for us at the time."

 

A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day.
A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day. Contributed

Rescuers placed a series of timber pallets across the mud to get access to the stricken wallaby, which was sedated within about 20 minutes of the RSPCA's arrival.

Firefighters arrived soon after and requested some machinery from the site to get the animal free.

All up, the effort took more than two hours.

A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day.
A wallaby was rescued from thick mud on a Redbank Plains building site. Unfortunately it had to be put down later that day. Contributed

Unfortunately, the wallaby had been through too much trauma leading up to the rescue and had to be put down once it got to the vet.

Ms Scolari said wallabies suffered from capture myopathy, which caused organs to shut down in times of extreme torment.

"It wasn't a great outcome in the end, which was a bit sad," she said.

Kangaroos and wallabies exist in large numbers in Redbank Plains and Ms Scolari said the RSPCA received regular reports of injured animals, mainly due to being hit by cars.



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