HISTORY: An artist's impression of what the Battle of One Tree Hill looked like.
HISTORY: An artist's impression of what the Battle of One Tree Hill looked like. National Unity Government

REVEALED: Multuggerah was killed years after One Tree Hill

THE final battle for Aboriginal warrior Multuggerah began in July 1846, when he led 500 warriors on a relentless siege of a station at Glenore Grove.

It lasted for weeks, but came to an abrupt end in August when his camp was attacked and he was killed.

Urban legend in Toowoomba suggests Multuggerah was killed in the Battle of One Tree Hill in 1843, but new research by historians Frank Uhr and Ray Kerkhove disproves that.

"The reason we say 1846 is we have accounts from then that mentions that he was killed then," Mr Kerkhove said.

Mr Uhr said following the Battle of One Tree Hill, which commemorates its 175th anniversary today, Multuggerah and his warriors led sieges down in the Lockyer Valley for three years.

"Anyone who showed leadership (in the Aboriginal groups) just happened to get in the way of a bullet then," Mr Uhr said.

The research will form part of a book to be released later this year.

A special commemoration service for the Battle of One Tree Hill, which began on September 12 1843, will be held today at Bill Gould's Look Out on Tobruk Drive from noon.

Europeans started settling in the Lockyer Valley and Darling Downs region in the 1800s.

Tensions grew in the 1840s as the newcomers attempted to expand, which soon broke into full-scale war. Multuggerah is said to have told the Europeans not to move up the range, but when he was ignored the leader started creating road blocks and chopping down timber so the wagons couldn't pass.

On September 12, 1843, Multuggerah led around 100 indigenous warriors in an ambush of three drays heading up the Range. This turned into a battle between the group and colonialists, which moved to Tabletop Mountain, known then as One Tree Hill.



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