NO DEAL: Council has knocked back a request by a developer for a massive discount on charges associated with the development of the Bunnings Warehouse at Plainland.
NO DEAL: Council has knocked back a request by a developer for a massive discount on charges associated with the development of the Bunnings Warehouse at Plainland.

BUNNINGS: Developer's request for $500k discount rejected

THE developer behind the Plainland Bunnings Warehouse proposal has had its hopes of a cheap development application dashed.

Developer Spinks&Co submitted a request to the Lockyer Valley Regional Council for a reduction of the infrastructure charges for the proposal.

While the council's adopted infrastructure charges would require Spinks&Co to pay $567,573.90 in infrastructure charges, the developer offered to pay just $75,000.

This figure equates to a discount of 86.8 per cent.

READ MORE: New Bunnings site revealed in plans

Spinks&Co also offered the same $75,000 figure to Queensland Urban Utilities for the infrastructure charges the utility company would levy on the proposal, a significant discount to the standard $370,960.80 that would be charged.

This submission was separate to the request made to council, as LVRC has no control over QUU charges.

In the report tabled to council, officers noted the developer and his consultant attended a council workshop on January 14.

During this meeting, they inferred that "from a feasibility perspective the development may not be able to proceed if their request is not granted".

The proposed warehouse will span more than 9000sq m and be built on Endeavour Way, Plainland.
The proposed warehouse will span more than 9000sq m and be built on Endeavour Way, Plainland.

Council officers recommended councillors refuse the request, and instead authorise the CEO to negotiate an infrastructure agreement with the developer to pay the charges over a maximum period of three years.

At its meeting today, the council agreed with the recommendation and voted unanimously to refuse the request.

Councillor Michael Hagan said he did not find the developer's reasoning for the discount acceptable.

"I don't think the developer has given us any reason for taking their offer of reduced infrastructure charges," Cr Hagan said.

Councillor Kathy McLean was also critical of the request.

"(The developer) tendered for the job, they must have known the cost upfront so they should have factored in infrastructure charges," Cr McLean said.

In submissions to the council as part of its request, the developer revealed the project was expected to generate "in excess" of 200 construction jobs during a 10-month period.

It was also revealed, once complete, the site would be expected to employ 80 full-time equivalent employees, and a further 40 part-time workers.



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