Rod Statham will auction a collection of antiques.
Rod Statham will auction a collection of antiques. Rob Williams

Rare samples of Ipswich history to be auctioned off

A 1830s spirit level brought to Redbank Plains from England in his grandfather's pocket is among the few antiques Rod Statham won't be selling under the hammer.

The family heirloom forms part of a rich collection of historical pieces Mr Statham has collected throughout his life in Ipswich beginning in the 1940s, many of which he will sell at auction later this month.

He expects up to 300 bidders to take home a piece of Ipswich history with everything from a wedding carriage to a rare collection of teddy bears for sale.

Mr Statham has been auctioning since 1967 when he joined his father's property business but has since turned his focus to rare antique and vintage collectable pieces gathered from all over the region.

Some of the items for sale came from his 82-year-old neighbour, some were his great-grandfather's, others are deceased estate and some of the carriages were sent in from the past Australian Carriage Drivers Association president James Black.

Mr Statham said the collection was a historical snapshot of Ipswich in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

"Me and my brothers and sisters played in the stables at Watsons Butcher and Bakery on Brisbane St," he said.

"They were full of all this stuff like the old butcher and baker delivery carts, that was our playground, we played there for years."

The auction is happening at 54 Kraatzs Rdm, Tallegalla on September 16 from 9.30am.

For auction

  • Wedding carriage
  • Holly sulky whip
  • Cobb & Co driving whip
  • Cedar dining suit and six chairs
  • Railway carriage light
  • Rare teddy bears
  • Cow bells
  • Cream can
  • Marbles
  • Meat slicer and lots more


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