DECISION MAKER: Sir Charles Fitzroy, governor of New South Wales from 1846 to 1855.
DECISION MAKER: Sir Charles Fitzroy, governor of New South Wales from 1846 to 1855.

Rare glimpse into our fascinating past

THIS is an interesting part of someone's letter which had only the initials to identify it. The letter concerned a planned meeting which didn't take place

THE writer and his wife in the 1850s resided at Woodend and became friends of some influential men in Ipswich.

About that time, he stated: "War was declared between Ipswich and Brisbane and he (C.B.D.) was called upon to subscribe where the abolition of further introduction of convicts into the colony and the petition for separation from New South Wales was necessary.

"The relationship between Ipswich and Brisbane became very much strained and something had to be done, so a resolution was passed "That a deputation would visit Cleveland and way lay Governor Sir Charles Fitzroy coming up to Moreton Bay and point out advantages of Cleveland as a port for Moreton Bay, with Ipswich for the Capital when Separation came.

"At the appointed day, the deputation mustered and started its journey. This consisted of George Thorn, John Panton, James Walsh, Fred Daveney, Thomas de Lacey Moffatt, Joshua Peter Bell, Forbes Charles and Edmund Collins, C Brewer Daveney.

"In due time, we arrived at Cleveland, first reining up outside a tent out of which a genial man Tommy Alford with a bottle of Martells which was served out to us wet mortals and we retired somewhere in the sight of the good ship Himalayan riding at anchor. On board, we spent the night playing loo (drinking). We vainly strained our eyes for the steamer with the governor, but his excellency had given us the slip in the night and had passed up river.

"Dispirited and sold, we bid a hasty retreat from Cleveland and rode to find beds for the night. And so, Ipswich never became the capital city."

 

WATERING HOLE: On the corner of Ellenborough and Brisbane sts, opposite St Paul's Anglican Church, the North Star Hotel was originally built in the 1850s and competed with the East St hotels.
WATERING HOLE: On the corner of Ellenborough and Brisbane sts, opposite St Paul's Anglican Church, the North Star Hotel was originally built in the 1850s and competed with the East St hotels. Contributed

WATER WELL

MR J.W. Hastings, a well-known baker of Silkstone, tapped an underground supply of water in August 1902 during a prolonged drought. Already on his property (cnr Blackstone & Station rds) Mr Hastings had a large well 56ft deep and seven and a half ft in circumference. At that time, there was only 60cm of water in the well, so he obtained apparatus and began boring downwards. When a further 10.6cm had been reached a good supply of water was tapped and flowed at the rate of 454 litres an hour.

EAST STREET HOTELS

THE following is a list of the hotels situated in East Street in the early 1860s.

Family Hotel (M. O'Sullivan) Separation Hotel (H Skinner) Victoria Hotel (James S Ogilvie) Cottage of Content (Godfrey O'Rourke) Criterion Hotel (John McDonald cnr East & South sts, Tattersalls Hotel (Michael Ford) cnr East & South Streets, Clarendon Hotel (David Mitchell) cnr Brisbane and East sts, Steam Packet Hotel (Martin Byrne) cnr East & Bremer sts.

TRAVEL FEAT

A FEAT in travelling, previously unheard of in the colony was accomplished in 1867 when several persons came from Dalby to Ipswich in one day, about 120km.

They were enabled to do this by using a train from Toowoomba. They had come from Dalby earlier by coach.

The train from Dalby which usually arrived in Ipswich at 2.38pm did not reach here until 3.30pm.The delay was said to have been caused by the train being so heavily loaded that the engine was unable to pull the train up the steep gradient when approaching the Little Liverpool range. It therefore had to proceed to Grandchester with half the train, then return for the other half.

DROWNING

On February 26, 1896, 11-year-old boy Harry Dudgeon was drowned in the Devil's Gully (King Edward Parade) sewer. He was the son of Mr John Dudgeon, fruiterer of Goodna.

The sewer extended from Brisbane St at this roadway to the Bremer River into which the water emptied. An open drain joined the sewer at Brisbane St and ran through several properties and beneath South Roderick and Pring Streets and extended in as far as Thorn St.

In times of heavy rain, the water through the area was very swift flowing and on the day of the drowning there had been heavy rain in the morning.



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