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Early writer records rapid transformation of Ipswich

GROWTH: This 1926 view of Ipswich from Limestone Hill shows the Central Girls and Central Boys Schools in the foreground.
GROWTH: This 1926 view of Ipswich from Limestone Hill shows the Central Girls and Central Boys Schools in the foreground. Contributed

WHILE Limestone (Ipswich) was still a "village" in the 1840/50s, one writer put pen to paper and recorded many of the happenings of that time.

Among church dignitaries who came here were the Rev W. Moore, Methodist; Bishop Tyrrell, Anglican Bishop of Newcastle; Archbishop Polding, head of the Roman Catholic Church; and the Rev Benjamin Glennie Anglican.

Among people who settled here were: Messrs John Germain, W. Peacock, M. McAnallen, James Cooke, John Hanran, John Hackett, T. Webb, P. Dwyer the burley cooper and "Tom" Hall, the humorous carpenter.

From 1850 on were most vigorous times in connection with the progress of Ipswich and West Moreton, of which Ipswich was, by common consent, voted the capital; and the agitations for causes were fierce.

The early Ipswichians were most ardent advocates of the cause of separation of Moreton Bay from New South Wales, which agitation was commenced about 1851.

Another cause was that of Ipswich being the future capital of the new colony; failing this Cleveland came into the running as a capital site. Squatters urged this suggestion as they desired to obtain a port alongside deep water, and these men were willing to erect a jetty at Cleveland so ships could be loaded and unloaded easily and goods from the "Downs" would be able to be shipped overseas and "down south".

Through the early days, a steady stream of immigrants were landed in Moreton Bay and many of these came on into Ipswich and settled.

Ipswich by 1851 had a population of 932 persons. About 1853, the banking business in Ipswich was first represented by the Bank of New South Wales, Joint Stock Bank and the Bank of Australasia.

Local lawyers were Mr (subsequently the Hon) Arthur Macalister and Mr James Walsh; then later Messrs C.F. Cribb and J. Malbon Thompson commenced their legal firms in Ipswich.

On August 4, 1852, the first direct mail steamship from England to America arrived in Sydney. This was regarded as a welcome event by the citizens of New South Wales and of course Ipswich.

The ship was the P&O screw steamer, Chusan, 700 tons, 30 horse-power, with Captain Down at the helm. It had left Southampton on May 16, rounded the Cape of Good Hope on June 29 and arrived in Melbourne on August 1.

LIFE MEMBER

AT a meeting at Toowoomba in April 1961, Mr J. Plant of Ipswich was made a life member of the Queensland Eisteddfod State Council. The only other life member of this council at that time was Mr A.P. Wynne of Bundaberg.

NEW BRANCH

OFFICERS for the newest branch of the Queensland Country Women's Association in Ipswich were elected on June 7, 1961.

The first president of the North Booval Branch was Mrs P.M. Naulty and other officers were vice-president Mrs A. Mallan; secretary Miss G. Logan; treasurer Mrs E. Josey; international secretary Mrs E. Willoughby; and press secretary Mrs B. Lawrence. The meeting had been called by Mrs J. Power.

OYSTERS

"BY every steamer leaving Brisbane - especially for Sydney in 1871 - one cannot help being struck by the large consignments of oysters - in fact the export had attained such dimensions as to cause serious fears that our supply will not only be seriously crippled but absolutely exhausted.

"Steps have now been taken to at least restrict the indiscriminate dredging for these bi-valves. Mr Henry Wyborn has obtained a licence under the Oyster Fisheries Act of 1863 for all the oyster banks in Moreton Bay; and parties wishing to obtain oysters for use in the colony must apply to him for the necessary authority. Parties taking oysters without first obtaining the permission of the licensees are liable to two years imprisonment under the Act."

Topics:  beryl johnston opinion times past



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