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POLICE RAID: Ipswich officers charge 35 people

BIG HAUL: Police seized more than $100,000 worth of earth moving equipment in raids last week.
BIG HAUL: Police seized more than $100,000 worth of earth moving equipment in raids last week. contributed

POLICE have recovered industrial earthmoving equipment worth an estimated $150,000 in a raid on a rural property.

As part of what was supposed to be a two-day operation targeting drug distribution, officers from Ipswich's Tactical Crime Squad pounced on a property at Peak Crossing last Thursday, where they discovered an excavator, skid-steer loader, tip truck, several stolen vehicles, boom crane arm, and an industrial generator.

Police will allege the equipment had been re-branded with the offender's business name.

 

Police seized more than $100,000 worth of earth moving equipment in raids last week.
Police seized more than $100,000 worth of earth moving equipment in raids last week. contributed

The stolen plant equipment formed just part of the two-day operation, carried out last Wednesday and Thursday with the assistance of police from Boonah, Goodna, Lowood, Kalbar, Harrisville, Ipswich, Karana Downs and Booval stations.

Information gathered led to 34 search warrants being executed across the Ipswich police district.

In total 35 people were charged with 63 offences ranging from producing dangerous drugs, to possessing tainted property and stealing and possessing ammunition.

Topics:  ipswich crime peak crossing stolen property



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