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The Gap State High School has performed well in the 2018 OP results. Students Levi Hockey, Campbell McFadden, Zach Thomas, Sophie Watson, Darcy Spurway and Tariq Soliman. Pic: Jamie Hanson

Queensland’s top 50 schools revealed

QUEENSLAND'S top schools have been revealed, with students from private and government schools across the state achieving stellar success.

The full 2018 Year 12 results of more than 500 Queensland schools are unveiled today by the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority, including how many of their students achieved the top OP bracket of between 1 and 5.

Two inner-city schools, Brisbane Grammar School and Brisbane Girls Grammar, were at the top of the pack with all their senior students receiving an OP ranking and more than half achieving an OP ranking of 1-5.

The high-achieving Brisbane State High School had a whopping 217 students - the most of any Queensland school - in the top bracket.

And although Toogoolawah State High School had only a small proportion of senior students opt for an OP ranking, those who did scored highly, with five out of their 10 seniors achieving an OP of 1-5.

Brisbane's St Joseph's College Gregory Terrace, All Hallows' School and Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie) plus Sunshine Coast Grammar School, Corinda's St Aidan's Anglican Girls' School and Roma State College round out the top 10.

Similar to Toogoolawah SHS, only about one in five of Roma State College's senior students were OP-eligible, but almost half of these were among the best in the state.

Brisbane Grammar School has scored the top OP results in the state. Current students Tim Weber, James Kenny, Nick Miller, Ryan Ah Yek and Noah Rosemann 17. Pic: Jamie Hanson
Brisbane Grammar School has scored the top OP results in the state. Current students Tim Weber, James Kenny, Nick Miller, Ryan Ah Yek and Noah Rosemann 17. Pic: Jamie Hanson

Brisbane Grammar School Teaching and Learning deputy headmaster Steve Uscinski said the school was "delighted" with its 2018 senior students' results, which included 40 OP1s, and said the class had graduated as a "fine group of young men".

"Our record of strong academic results flows from our commitment to a culture of thinking and learning, which enables every boy to achieve his personal best," he said.

"The most telling highlight of the 2018 senior results is the median OP5, equivalent to ATAR 93, which reflects the collective effort of the total cohort; every student at BGS commits to an academic course of study and his individual result is a product of the culture and spirit of the group."

The Gap State High School is also celebrating a successful 2018, with 43 students receiving an OP between 1 and 5.

Among the OP1 achievers in the class were Sophie Watson and Zach Thomas, who are both heading to the University of Queensland this year to study Physiotherapy and Advanced Finance and Economics, respectively.

Miss Watson said her advice for this year's Year 12s would be to get enough rest.

"If you don't look after yourself, you're going to be more stressed," she said.

"Also, sleep improves your productivity and concentration, so this helps when you are trying to study or finish off your assignment."

Mr Thomas said he found focusing on his weaker subject areas and working hard to improve those results was the key to him landing the top OP ranking.

"This was much more beneficial to my OP than trying to improve my strongest subjects," he said. "Knowing how to best manage my time to benefit my OP was a crucial factor in my success."

Brisbane Grammar School has scored the top OP results in the state. Current students Tim Weber, James Kenny, Nick Miller, Ryan Ah Yek and Noah Rosemann 17. Pic: Jamie Hanson
Brisbane Grammar School has scored the top OP results in the state. Current students Tim Weber, James Kenny, Nick Miller, Ryan Ah Yek and Noah Rosemann 17. Pic: Jamie Hanson

This year's Year 12 students will be the last Queenslanders to receive an OP ranking, as the ATAR system comes into effect across the state.

In 2018, just under half of Year 12 students received an OP ranking, with a large majority of schools offering a variety of alternative pathways for graduates to enter higher education, or the workforce, including VET qualifications and school-based apprenticeships or training.

A number of Queensland students also received alternative academic pathway options to OP rankings, such as International Baccalaureates.

QCAA chief executive Chris Rider said Queensland's broad curriculum supported pathways to further education, training and work for all Year 12 students, while also challenging the most academic students to reach the highest standards possible.

"The data shows that Queensland's Year 12 students are graduating from high school with the skills and qualifications to follow a range of rewarding work, further education and training pathways," Mr Rider said.

Education Minister Grace Grace said Queensland's education system was "world class" and, for 2018's cohort, now "the world was their oyster".

"It's great to see they are pursuing their passions and their dreams, and they've done exceptionally well," she said.