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Dr Heidi Walk
Dr Heidi Walk

Qld doctor makes Forbes top 30 under 30 list

The Forbes 30 Under 30 Class of 2021 presents 600 of the brightest young entrepreneurs, leaders, and stars from around the world and we were proud to see how many young Aussies made the cut. Here are some of them:

Danzal Baker (Baker Boy), 24

Awarded the Order of Australia, the indigenous rapper known as Baker Boy, from Victoria, has been recognised for his contributions to Australia's performing arts, including rapping in his native language Yolngu Matha. Baker also won Young Australian of the Year at 2019's National indigenous Music Awards, and last year was named Artist of the Year.

Baker Boy aka Danzal Baker is an Indigenous rapper who made the 30 Under 30 Forbes list. Picture: Mark Cranitch.
Baker Boy aka Danzal Baker is an Indigenous rapper who made the 30 Under 30 Forbes list. Picture: Mark Cranitch.

Emmanuel Barbas, 25 and James Hachem, 24

Barbas and Hachem co-founded Melbourne-based beauty brand Alya Skin in 2018 featuring the signature pink clay mask, made from red and white kaolin clays. The top seller helped Alya Skin generate $3.5 million in sales in its first year in business.

James Hachem (R), who is the founder of successful cosmetic company, Alya Skin, with his father Joe Hachem. Picture: David Crosling
James Hachem (R), who is the founder of successful cosmetic company, Alya Skin, with his father Joe Hachem. Picture: David Crosling

Jamie Cerexhe, 28

Co-founder and engineering head of Mastt, the Sydney-based start-up that helps government construction projects finish on time and within budget, founded in 2018. This is done through an innovative use of software that tracks all aspects of construction projects. Mastt joined Microsoft's ScaleUp program and won the start-up pitch competition at the Oracle Construction Technology Summit.

Jamie Cerexhe has taken engineering to a new level. Picture: Supplied
Jamie Cerexhe has taken engineering to a new level. Picture: Supplied


Genevieve Day, 29

The founder of the influencer talent agency Day Management, a Melbourne-based start-up that represents some of the country's leading social media personalities including fashionista Kristy Wu and model Jessica Vander Leahy. Day was a finalist at the Melbourne Young Entrepreneur Awards in 2019.

 

Victoria Devine, 29

Devine is founder of Melbourne-based financial advisory start-up Zella, a personal finance site for millennial women, and was named one of the 50 most influential financial advisers in Australia last year.


Eleni Glouftsis, 28

In 2017 Glouftsis became the first woman to umpire an Australian Football League match in Victoria. Since then, she has officiated 40 games and in January received the Medal of the Order of Australia for her service to the sport.

Umpire Eleni Glouftsis has made the Forbes 30 Under 20 list. Picture: Michael Klein
Umpire Eleni Glouftsis has made the Forbes 30 Under 20 list. Picture: Michael Klein


Alexandra Grigg, 29

A senior portfolio analyst with South Australian Venture Capital Fund, Grigg was named Young Leader of the Year at the Women in Finance Awards 2020, which was hosted by Australian media company Momentum Media.

Alexandra Grigg, 29. Picture: Greg Adams -Imagestix
Alexandra Grigg, 29. Picture: Greg Adams -Imagestix


Priscilla Hajiantoni, 27

Melbourne-based skincare brand Bangn Body started with natural firming lotion gaining fans through social media before branching into other products and generating an estimated $8 million in its first two years of business.


Hunter Johnson, 29

Johnson from Victoria, started The Man Cave in 2014 to fight the issue of toxic masculinity in Australia, where one in three women experience physical violence from men, according to government statistics. Johnson's work with the awareness platform led him to be a finalist for the 2020 Victoria Young Australian of the Year.


Skye Kinder, 29

Kinder became an advocate for healthcare patients in rural areas of Australia after watching her father struggle to travel to Melbourne from Central Victoria for specialist treatments. She was appointed vice president of Rural Doctors Association of Victoria, and was awarded 2019 Victorian Young Australian of the Year.

Dr. Skye Kinder is an advocate for rural/regional communities. Picture: Aaron Francis/The Australian
Dr. Skye Kinder is an advocate for rural/regional communities. Picture: Aaron Francis/The Australian


Natalie Khoei, 26 and Shadi Kord, 27

Khoei and Kord from Sydney, became firm friends over their love for fashion and co-founded Meshki as a small e-commerce business to sell accessories that reflected their taste. They expanded into a full fashion brand and now have over 750,000 customers, most from Instagram.

The faces behind online fashion brand Meshki Natalie Khoei, 26, and Shadi Kord, 27. Picture: Dylan Robinson
The faces behind online fashion brand Meshki Natalie Khoei, 26, and Shadi Kord, 27. Picture: Dylan Robinson


Nicole Liu, 26

Kin Fertility is a Sydney-based start-up with an online contraception subscription service, where users fill out a questionnaire, consult with doctors and can have their contraceptive pills delivered to them. Liu raised $800,000 in funding from investment firm Blackbird Ventures last year.

Nicole Liu founded Kin Fertility after a misdiagnosis. Picture: Supplied
Nicole Liu founded Kin Fertility after a misdiagnosis. Picture: Supplied

Caleb Marshall, 29

Caleb Marshall wanted to maximise his health through diet and started Tropeaka with his housemate Blake Mackenzie in 2016. The Sydney-based health food and nutrition company makes and sells protein, superfood, energy bars and herbal tea and promotes the food via Instagram.


Keita Matsumoto, 28

Matsumoto, from Victoria, serves on the Board of Directors of Kindred Spirits Foundation, investing in education and workforce development across Australia. He was a Gurukul Scholar studying under His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama and was recognised in the 2018 Australian Education Awards.

Keita Matsumoto advocates for investing in teaching across Australia. Picture: Supplied
Keita Matsumoto advocates for investing in teaching across Australia. Picture: Supplied


Sanjana Nagesh, 24

Nagesh, who is Indian and is based in Sydney, wanted to positively reinforce South Asian women in the mainstream media. She started the Instagram page BrownGirlGang in 2017 showcasing their successes and celebrating South Asian culture. BrownGirlGang has more than 120,000 followers, including celebrities like US actor/writer/producer Mindy Kaling.


Grace Partridge, 28

Partridge, from NSW, started Australian not for profit Antidote in 2015 and helps to promote social justice causes through culture and the arts, often at iconic venues such as the Sydney Opera House.


Harry Sanders, 23

Sanders founded search engine optimisation company StudioHawk in Melbourne when he was just 17 years old. He now earns $3 million in revenues from more than 300 clients including fitness apparel brand New Balance and Germany's Bauer Media Group.


Shannon Speight, 29

The former veterinarian co-founded agritech start-up Black Box in 2019 and has travelled 60,000km across Australia and collected data from more than 700,000 animals to help cattle farmers track and analyse livestock to boost productivity.

Queensland livestock vet Shannon Speight. Picture: Supplied.
Queensland livestock vet Shannon Speight. Picture: Supplied.


Jade Spooner, 28 and Amal Wakim, 27

Best friends Spooner and Wakim started their Sydney-based nutritional business after they lost 50kg between them by following a certain eating plan. Their start-up Equalution ranked No. 14 out of 50 companies for revenue growth over three years on Deloitte Technology Fast 50 Australia list last year.

Amal Wakim and Jade Spooner. Picture: Christian Gilles
Amal Wakim and Jade Spooner. Picture: Christian Gilles


Iain Stewart, 29 and Tim Stewart, 29

Identical twin brothers Iain and Tim Stewart co-founded Exergenics in 2019, a Melbourne-based start-up that develops software to help improve commercial airconditioning to ensure maximum energy efficiency.


Heidi Walkden, 26

Walkden is a research fellow at Griffith University's Clem Jones Centre for Neurobiology and Stem Cell Research where she examines treatments for brain infections, particularly bacteria causing melioidosis.

 

Originally published as Qld doctor makes Forbes top 30 under 30 list



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