Ashwell State School principal Deborah Lewis with the school's youngest student Tahlia Cole, 5, and the school's oldest former student Ivy Clark (nee Loveday) at Ashwell State School's 125th anniversary celebrations on Saturday, November 10.
Ashwell State School principal Deborah Lewis with the school's youngest student Tahlia Cole, 5, and the school's oldest former student Ivy Clark (nee Loveday) at Ashwell State School's 125th anniversary celebrations on Saturday, November 10. Claudia Baxter

Proud day for Ashwell

IT'S NOT often school children can be convinced to wear their uniforms on a weekend.

But the 66 students of Ashwell State School, outside Rosewood, proudly put on the blue and white on Saturday to celebrate the 125th year of their school.

Despite the rain cancelling some planned activities, celebrations went on anyway, with many turning out to recognise the school's milestone.

Past and present staff and students, as well as members of the local community, gathered in spite of the weather on Saturday.

One of the school's guests of honour was 98-year-old Ivy Clark (nee Loveday), the oldest former student, who attended Ashwell in the 1920s.

Mrs Clark and her brother Vince were the eldest of the Loveday family to attend.

The family has had a proud history with the school, with their great-grandfather, Walter Loveday, donating about half the land of the present school ground, and Lovedays attending the school to this day.

"There was only one building when I was here," Mrs Clark said.

"One building and one teacher.

"We used to live just down the road and I'd walk to school here every day."

Mrs Clark was one of the guests of honour, cutting the celebratory cake with the school's youngest student Tahlia Cole.

Members of another long-time Ashwell family, the Reinkes, were also present. A student in the 1970s and early '80s, Peter Reinke said four generations of his family had attended Ashwell school.

The road the school is on is named after the Reinke family which has lived across from the school for generations.

Mr Reinke said he was at the school when it started expanding beyond one building.

"When I started there was just one building here," he said.

"But by the time I was in Grade 7 there was the second building too."

The school will bury a time capsule containing schoolwork and artefacts. It will be reopened when the school celebrates its 150th anniversary.



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