Program tackles literacy

LITERACY is in focus for a new program designed for Indigenous children.

USQ Ipswich has connected with an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health service to help improve literacy outcomes for Indigenous children.

Kambu Health's Literacy Development Program started sessions at USQ Ipswich for a group of Year 4 to 6 students.

USQ pre-service education students will guide children through activity-based literacy development modelled on USQ lecturer Kylie Meyer's Indigenous-focused resource booklet, while Kambu Health representatives offer various workshops and activities.

For 10 weeks, they will cover a range of topics including: culture, identity, goal setting, aspirations, education and schooling.

At the most recent session, elders shared stories with the children and their families.

Kambu Health program manager Sharon Kinchela said it was an honour to work alongside USQ.

USQ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander engagement coordinator Laurie-anne Parsons said the program was an opportunity for parents, carers and families to be actively involved in their child's education, embedding culture and encouraging future aspirations.

The program is partially funded through the Commonwealth Government's Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP) in 2017, to improve the access, participation and success of students from communities under-represented in higher education.

For more about the program, contact Laurie-anne Parsons, laurie-anne.parsons@

usq.edu.au or phone 3812 6043.



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