Allie Butler and Carmel Bracey and other Cascade Gardens residents are among those who agree with a PRD survey that shows more people are attracted to life in retirement villages.
Allie Butler and Carmel Bracey and other Cascade Gardens residents are among those who agree with a PRD survey that shows more people are attracted to life in retirement villages. Sarah Harvey

Village people are the happiest

ENID Alback and her friends at Cascade Gardens retirement village aren't alone in feeling village life is the perfect way to live up their golden years.

A PRDnationwide poll shows close to 40 per cent of respondents would consider moving in to a retirement village when they reach that stage of life.

Mrs Alback, 70, moved into the village more than six years ago with her late husband Lloyd and said it was a great place to be.

“We live in the happiest village in Ipswich,” Mrs Alback said.

“It is a social place and everyone joins in and has a good time.”

Her friend Lorna McClurg, 78, agreed, saying moving into the village eight years ago with her husband Dan had been a choice.

She said life for her and her group of friends involved regular outings to the nearby tavern, “fish and chip” Friday at the Ipswich RSL and trips away.

Other activities at the village include bingo, craft afternoons and concerts.

Carmel Bracey and husband Arthur moved to the village a decade ago after they both retired.

The 79-year-old said the couple had wanted to upgrade to a better lifestyle and say good-bye to upkeep and home maintenance on their home at Silkstone.

Mrs Bracey said they also relished the peace of mind which came with village life.

“I think the atmosphere is nice,” she said.

“It is a pleasant looking out on the gardens and everyone seems to get along with everyone.”

PRDnationwide research director Aaron Maskrey said security was the main reason people gave for why they would move to a retirement village.

“They are sometimes travelling and like the idea of their property being maintained and secure while they are away,” he said.

He said seniors were often drawn to the idea of downgrading cars and houses to have extra money to enjoy a better retirement lifestyle.



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