Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers gathered at Wivenhoe Dam to simulate scenes resembling real emergencies and design new training sessions.
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers gathered at Wivenhoe Dam to simulate scenes resembling real emergencies and design new training sessions.

PICTURES: Swift action as fireys prepare for summer storms

IT IS like Groundhog Day for a firey who has seen countless times how quickly a drive can turn deadly when flood waters are involved.

Queensland Fire and Rescue Services Swift Water Instructor John Roache said a higher trend in severe weather events meant more and more cars were becoming entrapped in floodwaters.

"I've got countless stories of having to access people in flooded waters, who have driven in and the vehicle cuts out just because the electrics can't handle the water or the water is pushed into the motor," Mr Roache said.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.

"The majority of our rescues are vehicles off roadways or causeways."

LOCAL NEWS: Driver allegedly flees after busted tyres spark grass fire

Spanning three days, Queensland's 16 senior Swift Water development trainers gathered at Wivenhoe Dam to simulate scenes resembling real emergencies.

The goal was to design new training sessions and workshops to pass on to team members at stations

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.

across the state.

"We need to arm our technicians with as close to real life situations as they're going to be confronted with," Mr Roache said

"We have constantly evolved our training over 15 years to try and give our technicians the best training to keep them safe and aid the community in our ability to do efficient rescues."

Training normally takes place at Tully River in Far North Queensland but was trialled at Wivenhoe this week to allow ease of use for a new training prop.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.

Lowering a real car into Wivenhoe Dam, trainers were able to build a rescue plan around a real-life situation.

LOCAL NEWS: IPSWICH EYESORES: Candidates reveal their plans

"In the past, we've been limited to using large rocks or overturned boats," Mr Roache

"But this means we were able to use the windows, or the doors or get people off the roof - using a car meant this was as close to real life as possible."

He said it was vital for drivers to avoid driving through flood waters and said it was a good rule of thumb to steer clear when the road wasn't visible.

 

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Swift Water development trainers.

"Avoid it at all costs - I know they're trying to get home to their families but the safest thing to do is to find a different route," he said.

"If people do find themselves stuck, stay calm, call triple-0 and ask for fire, pull the hand break on, remove the seatbelt, wind down the window and, if you're able-bodied, climb onto the roof."

Read more news by Ebony Graveur.



Viral fragments of COVID found in Ipswich wastewater

Premium Content Viral fragments of COVID found in Ipswich wastewater

The areas serviced by the treatment plant include suburbs in and around Ipswich

Woman allegedly six times the limit during midmorning drive

Premium Content Woman allegedly six times the limit during midmorning drive

Police allege the woman crashed into three parked vehicles before being detained

Offender crashes and burns on motorbike while fleeing police

Premium Content Offender crashes and burns on motorbike while fleeing police

Zipping down a footpath at speed, a motorcycle rider laughed and smirked at the...