ON FIRE: Mayor Paul Pisasale sells another Big Issue.
ON FIRE: Mayor Paul Pisasale sells another Big Issue. Sarah Harvey

Paul's pitch is a winner

IPSWICH Mayor Paul Pisasale was more than happy to step up to a Big Issue selling challenge, and his enthusiasm paid off.

Cr Pisasale helped put the spotlight on Ipswich's homeless people yesterday, and broke Brisbane Lord Mayor Graham Quirk's record for selling the magazines along the way.

He sold 35 copies of the street magazine during half an hour spent spruiking outside the Ipswich train station, more than double Cr Quirk's 17 copies.

"It's a great cause, and I'm happy to say we also beat Brisbane," Cr Pisasale said.

Cr Pisasale will find out if Logan mayor Pam Parker beats his record in the final leg of the challenge today at 1pm.

The Big Issue Queensland manager Cassandra Roland said it was great to see support for Ipswich vendors had grown.

Ms Roland said The Big Issue was rolled out to the Ipswich CBD in November last year, and had reached a circulation of 120 magazines sold per fortnight.

She said the sales benefited five vendors, who sold at venues between the train station and the Ipswich Mall.

"The Ipswich community has really embraced the vendors," Ms Roland said.

"Our aim is to continue growing sales in Ipswich.

"By getting mayors out on the street selling the magazine, we hope to lift the profile of our vendors and the magazine."

WHAT'S THE ISSUE?

  • Homeless and disadvantaged vendors sell The Big Issue for $5, and keep $2.50 from each copy sold.
  • 7.5 million copies of The Big Issue have been sold since the national magazine's launch in 1996 - generating $15 million for vendors.
  • The Big Issue was launched in Brisbane in 1997, in Ipswich in November 2011, and will launch in Logan today.



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