Menu
News

Oh boy! Most Aussie girls reckon they'd be better off male

The Our Watch and Plan International Australia report, Everyday Sexism: Girls' and Young Women's Views on Gender Inequality in Australia, outlines how our young women experience ongoing discrimination and sexism in their own homes, at schools and in almost every other aspect of their lives.
The Our Watch and Plan International Australia report, Everyday Sexism: Girls' and Young Women's Views on Gender Inequality in Australia, outlines how our young women experience ongoing discrimination and sexism in their own homes, at schools and in almost every other aspect of their lives. Contributed

MOST Aussie girls believe they would have better futures if they were boys.

A survey of 600 adolescent females aged 16-19 released to coincide with today's International Day of the Girl reveals most young Australian women experience sexism.

The survey forms the basis of the Our Watch and Plan International Australia report, Everyday Sexism: Girls' and Young Women's Views on Gender Inequality in Australia.

The report outlines how young women experience ongoing discrimination and sexism in their homes, schools and in almost every other part of their lives.

Only 8% of young women who responded to the survey said they felt they were "always” treated equally to boys while just 14% of girls said they received the same opportunities to succeed as their male counterparts.

One in three girls said they did more housework than their brothers while the same number of girls believed it would be easier to pursue their dream career if they were male.

More than 50% of girls said they they were "sometimes, seldom or never valued for their brains and ability more than their looks”.

Just one in six young women said they were "respected” for their talents rather than their physical appearance.

Plan International Australia deputy CEO Susanne Legena said the survey showed sexism was having a major impact on how adolescent females viewed their futures.

"What these girls are telling us is that inequality starts early and is everywhere - in our homes, in school and on the streets,” Ms Legena said.

"It's gravely concerning that girls, in 2016, are saying they don't feel valued for their intellect and their opinions.

"We know there is a pocket money gender gap and that many girls do more housework than their brothers.”

Our Watch CEO Mary Barry said gender inequality was key driver of violence against women and addressing it was the key to ending gendered violence in Australia.

"Violence against women begins with disrespect and gender inequality,” Ms Barry said.

"As this survey shows, we have a long way to go to achieve gender equality in Australia.

"A culture where there is no violence against women is possible, but it requires a big shift in attitudes, behaviours and policy.

"The way men and women employ, teach, parent and relate to each other must be grounded in equity and respect.

"We must find a new normal; as long as girls and women are seen as less equal than boys and men, violence against women will continue.” - ARM NEWSDESK

Topics:  our watch sexism women



The times they are a changing

GOOD POINT: Local artist Kylie Stevens said she she would be devastated if the arts awards was to close.

Arts finally being recognised as being essential to our community

Lake's water quality a worry after 20 fish found "belly up"

Invasive fish species, the tilapia, have been found floating belly up at Spring Lake.

Concerned residents alerted the State Government two weeks ago

Ipswich video store beating the odds by staying open

Jo and John Wilton owners of Network Video Winston Glades.

Ipswich video store owners predict a revival of the industry

Local Partners