WAIT ON: By the time Australia Day rolls around New Year’s resolutions are but a distant memory.
WAIT ON: By the time Australia Day rolls around New Year’s resolutions are but a distant memory. Think Stock

New Year’s resolutions don’t carry any weight

NEW Year's resolutions are a bit like paying $29 for a flight to Sydney. You know it is not going to end well but you do it anyway.

All I have been asked for the past two weeks is what my New Year's resolutions are.

And there's only one thing that annoys me more than a four-hour delay at the airport and that's feeling left out.

So I do my best to keep up with Joneses and depending on who I'm talking to adjust my resolutions to suit:

For example:

To mum: Spend more time with family.

To best friend: Spend more time with friends.

To super fit friend: Do more exercise.

To environmentally conscience friend: Stop leaving all the lights in the house when I drive the 20 metres to the corner store.

To anti-smoking friend: Quit smoking.

To house mate: I will remember wheelie-bin days.

By the time I get through all my friends I should be up there with Mother Teresa except there is just one flaw in my divine conquest - my word seems to mean diddlysquat.

I'm not sure if everyone else has cottoned on but I actually have the same resolutions every single year.

In fact the only thing I can be sure of is that this time next year I'll be regurgitating the same old favourites with a renewed enthusiasm.

I'm not usually a liar, when I share my resolutions I actually believe that I am going to become some kind of clean-living humanitarian who puts her wheelie-bin out regularly but year in, year out I never quite get there.

But the more I think about it nobody I know ever gets there.

I wouldn't dare point out to super fit friend that she did not actually run a marathon this year like she said she was going to and I'm too polite to tell environmentally conscience friend that at no point in the past 12 months did she throw caution to the wind and venture aboard Sea Shepherd to save the whales.

All in all I estimate that less than one per cent* of the general population actually stick to their New Year's resolutions - similar odds to winning the lotto. (*Not a scientific figure)

Yes, by the time Australia Day rolls around we have forgotten about the importance of a healthy BMI and are back in the swing of living the way we have for the past however many years.

So what's the point, why do go through the same song and dance every year to inevitably wind-up in an almost identical position to where we were last year?

I guess it's the same reason we continue to buy lotto tickets even though we know we have Buckley's chance of winning - hope.

We hope that one day we're going to sneak into that enviable one per cent and possibly change our lives for the better.

Wouldn't it be nice?



New Ripley homes, and why size isn’t everything

Premium Content New Ripley homes, and why size isn’t everything

Australians crave space, but a bit of Japanese know-how might be able to change...

‘Waste of time’: Magistrate criticises DPP over drug case

Premium Content ‘Waste of time’: Magistrate criticises DPP over drug case

An Ipswich magistrate said the Supreme Court should have dealt with a man’s drug...

Teen girl hospitalised after early morning crash

Premium Content Teen girl hospitalised after early morning crash

The two-vehicle crash caused traffic delays in Springfield this morning