New technology 1000 times faster than NBN

NOKIA says it has manipulated fibre optic cable to deliver speeds 1000 times faster than those promised by the National Broadband Network.

In a trial of new technology which the company is calling Probabilistic Constellation Shaping (PCS) it's claimed a speed of one terabit per second was achieved.

Placed in context that's 1000 faster than the top speed promised by the NBN, or Google's wireless technology, both of which are thought to be capable of delivering 1 megabit per second.

"Nokia Bell Labs, Deutsche Telekom T-Labs and the Technical University of Munich have achieved unprecedented transmission capacity and spectral efficiency in an optical communications field trial with a new modulation technique," a statement from Nokia reads.

"The breakthrough research could extend the capability of optical networks to meet surging data traffic demands."

Tech publication Inverse states the breakthrough could prove key in rolling out 5G across Australia's mobile phone network, or even enabling driverless cars to communicate with one another.

Dr Rod Tucker is a professor at the University of Melbourne and former Director of the Institute for a Broadband-Enabled Society told News.com.au the increase in speed was only possible with fibre optic cable - not copper.

Dr Tucker said fibre optic cable could achieve speeds: "Far, far greater than anything copper is capable of."

And he said it may not be all that long before we are enjoying the new speeds.

"The time from lab demonstration to commercialisation is very fast, often about five years," he said. 



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