Last month the council's Conservation and Environment Committee dealt with a problem colony that had re-established itself at Yamanto.
Last month the council's Conservation and Environment Committee dealt with a problem colony that had re-established itself at Yamanto. Mike Richards GLA061017BATS

New techniques change how council battles with flying-foxes

EACH flying-fox nest across Ipswich will be assessed and dealt with on an individual basis after an Ipswich City Council review.

The city's blanket Flying-fox Roost Management Plan will be amended and allow the council to assess and deal with each nest differently.

Last month the council's Conservation and Environment Committee dealt with a problem colony that had re-established itself at Yamanto.

In 2016 the council successfully created a distance buffer between residents and roosting flying foxes by removing weeds and trimming native vegetation.

Participating residents were responsible for the ongoing management of vegetation on their properties.

The re-established colony at Yamanto prompted the council to review its flying-fox management policy and ensure the best practice was used.

In a report provided to councillors this week, it was recommended an individual plan be established for each know nest in the region.

"These local plans will identify the risk level for the roost, illustrate constraints and local considerations, and list suitable management actions going forward," the report said.

How councils deal with flying-foxes has increased in sophistication since amendments to the Nature Conservation Act 1992 were made in late 2013.

One of the significant changes has been the reduction in the number of active next dispersals undertaken.

"Based on the evidence and outcomes concerning active dispersals it is well recognised across local and state government that dispersals are associated with high risk, high cost and low success rate," the council's report noted.

"While dispersal is now used less frequently across southeast Queensland, the number of in-situ management techniques has increased and is highly variable."

Techniques include, but are not limited to, canopy mounter sprinklers, artificial buffering and subsidy programs.



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