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Musk’s admission as Dogecoin plummets

 

The much-hyped appearance of tech billionaire Elon Musk on popular American comedy show Saturday Night Live had some unexpected results - other than the hoped-for bump in ratings.

Musk, who is valued at $166 billion ($A212bn), had been under pressure to deliver the famous SNL opening monologue, and then step in as a cast member on the often hit-or-miss comedy sketches that fill the 90-minute late night show.

Many wondered if Musk would cut it as a comedian or fill the shoes of other controversial guests such as Donald Trump in 2015.

Even some SNL cast members seemed less than thrilled about the billionaire's upcoming guest spot. Aidy Bryant reposted a tweet from Senator Bernie Sanders calling out the 50 wealthiest Americans for owning the majority of the nation's wealth as "a moral obscenity," and there were rumours some cast members might boycott the epsode in protest; but Pete Davidson told Seth Meyers, "I don't know why people are freaking out."

 

 

Musk, 49, confidently took to the stage and was funny - while sharing with the live audience that he has Asperger's syndrome.

"I'm actually making history tonight as the first host with Asperger's to host SNL," he announced to applause. "Or at least the first to admit it."

But it turns out that Musk isn't actually the first SNL host with Asperger's syndrome: Former cast member Dan Aykroyd, who hosted the show in 2003, had openly addressed his Asperger's, according to the Daily Beast.

While some followers applauded Musk for coming out about his autism, others on social media were quick to point out that Aykroyd indeed deserved that claim as the first host with Asperger's.

"Dan Aykroyd is autistic and hosted SNL in 2003. In case anyone forgot," wrote one Twitter user.

Aykroyd, who served as a cast member from 1975 to 1979, has spoken publicly about living with Asperger's and told media, "It wasn't diagnosed until the early '80s when my wife persuaded me to see a doctor."

But the autism brag wasn't the only bombshell of the evening.

After Musk mentioned Dogecoin as his Mother's Day present for his mum during the opening monologue, the cryptocurrency slid in value by six cents.

"I'm excited for my Mother's Day gift," Musk's mother said in her own guest appearance. "I just hope it's not Dogecoin."

Later, in a sketch with Michael Che, Musk was quizzed over the coin.

"What is Dogecoin?" Che asked him.

"Well, it was created in 2013..." Musk responded.

Pressed about how the currency works, Musk said, "It's an unstoppable financial vehicle that's going to take over the world."

"Oh, so it's a hustle?" replied Che.

"Yeah, it's a hustle", concluded Musk.

 

Jackson Palmer, founder of Dogecoin. Elon Musk warned investors of volatility while sayng it was his favourite virtual currency. Picture: James Croucher
Jackson Palmer, founder of Dogecoin. Elon Musk warned investors of volatility while sayng it was his favourite virtual currency. Picture: James Croucher

 

Musk's quip did not do any favours for Dogecoin investors causing the currency to slide further - by 21 per cent according to Coindesk - despite the fact that Musk has said it is his preferred cryptocurrency.

The day before the show, Musk did warn investors to use caution when trading in Dogecoin and other currencies, due to their extreme volatility.

"Cryptocurrency is promising, but please invest with caution!" he tweeted.

 

 

Sharing the Saturday Night Live limelight with Musk were musical performers Miley Cyrus and fast-rising Sydney music star, Kid Laroi.

Originally published as Musk's admission as Dogecoin plummets



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