Nutritionist Caroline Toner with client Greg Tomlin.
Nutritionist Caroline Toner with client Greg Tomlin. Cordell Richardson

More junk food, more cancer says study

AN IPSWICH nutritionist has called for locals to ditch junk food as one of the largest ever nutrition studies confirms eating low-nutrient foods increases the risk of developing cancer.

The EPIC study examined the eating habits of 471,495 adults from 10 European countries with 49,794 newly diagnosed cancer cases.

Researchers analysed the choices consumers made based on a food-labelling system similar to the Australian Health Star Rating.

It was found participants eating 'low star' diets high in sugar, saturated fats and added salt had a greater overall risk of developing cancer.

The results come as no surprise to Wild Berry Nutrition's Caroline Toner, who says that the study reinforces previous evidence that eating a diet laden with highly processed foods can lead to adverse health outcomes.

"These foods have very little or no nutritional value and are lacking in fibre,” she said.

Clients Greg and Helen Tomlin say that since they cut out processed foods like cheese and started focusing on whole foods at every meal, Helen's coeliac symptoms are under control and Greg has stopped needing to use antacids and pain medication.

"It's been fantastic for me, my energy levels have gone through the roof,” Mrs Tomlin said.

Ms Toner's advice for avoiding the harm caused by processed and refined foods includes steering clear of foods that come in a bag or a box and eating predominantly fresh whole-foods.

"In other words just eat real foods,” she said.



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