Ipswich heritage home breaks 10-year sale record

THE most expensive house of its kind in Ipswich has made real estate history.

Booval House, a historically restored Georgian mansion set on an acre at Booval, has sold for more than $1.2m.

It's the highest price a residential property of the same kind has sold for in Ipswich in more than a decade.

Ray White Real Estate principal Warren Ramsey said the property was in a league of its own and strict National Trust regulations prevented the buyer from sub-dividing or developing the land.

It means the property must remain a home and a place of historical significance but can also host the occasional wedding.

"Because of National Trust limitations on what you could do with the property, even though you're buying an acre in the middle of town, you can't sub-divide," Mr Ramsey said.

"It's fantastic for what it is but it's not a development block."

Ms Ramsey said that the strict limitations meant that the eventual buyer had to be cashed up and willing to live in a luxury home in the Ipswich suburbs.

"When you're playing with 0.1 per cent of the market place in the city, you're going to have a huge volume of history but there's not a huge volume of interest that is ready, willing and able right now to do something about it," he said.

 

 

Mr Ramsey said the painstaking renovations of the past 20 years made the property worth its record selling price.

"We had a really good cross-section of people through the property from owner occupiers to charities to the medical fraternity and the eventual buyer was a surgeon from Brisbane."

Mr Ramsey said the buyer came to Ipswich to attend an event, saw the property and instantly fell in love.

"He was prepared to get a lot of house for his money," Mr Ramsey said.

 

History that's been 150 years in the making

A GEORGIAN mansion that became the namesake of an Ipswich suburb has been a couple's labour of love for the past 20 years.

Booval House owners John and Helen Jackson led a $1 million makeover to restore the 19th century farmstead and former convent to its former glory.

They have meticulously converted the property's sulky shed, chapel, cellar, workrooms and summerhouse into a replica of the home's original features.

"We liked this house because the heritage was hidden.

"The gardens were basically untouched," Dr Jackson said.   

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When they bought the aluminium-clad home in 1997, it featured louvres and metal roller doors - a product of a 1990s renovation.

"People didn't realise it was built in the 1850s. It just looked like a big, two-story building that had the verandas enclosed.

It was a challenge. We had to strip it back and restore it," Dr Jackson said.  

ON THE MARKET: Helen and Dr John Jackson are selling Booval House.
ON THE MARKET: Helen and Dr John Jackson are selling Booval House. Emma Clarke

"We've had another big run in the past three years. The final phase is now finished.

"We have completed the conservation of Booval House. Hopefully, it's been saved for generations."  



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