Len Harrison talks about the mosquito breeding season and things residents can do to limit the infestation.
Len Harrison talks about the mosquito breeding season and things residents can do to limit the infestation. Rob Williams

Make mozzies buzz off

IPSWICH residents are being asked to check their backyards for mozzie breeding grounds to keep dengue fever in check for another summer.

As the storm season rolls in, councillor Andrew Antoniolli has called for citizens to look through their backyards for signs of the perennial nemesis of the summer barbecue.

Pools of still water found in pot plant bases, old tyres and roof guttering are a haven for mosquitoes which carry dengue fever.

In 2011 Queensland Health recorded 160 cases of dengue fever, with all cases in southern Queensland contracted in the tropics or overseas.

Although cases of the disease are rare in southern Queensland, Cr Antoniolli said it was still necessary to take precautions.

"Dengue fever is traditionally more prolific in the northern part of Queensland but there is some suggestion it is moving south," he said.

"We do have to remain vigilant, particularly as the storm season has begun."

The risk of dengue fever aside, Cr Antoniolli said keeping your home free of the annoying buzzing of a mosquito while enjoying the longer evenings was reason enough to be vigilant.

"Regardless of dengue fever, at this time of year everyone enjoys having a barbecue but nobody enjoys being bitten by mosquitos."

He said residents should take the time to check suspect areas for the sake of themselves and their neighbours.

If residents follow the steps listed on council's mosquito control website, another summer could be free from dengue fever.

Cr Antoniolli said residents should contact council if they were aware of mosquitos breeding on council land.

Dengue fever is carried by the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, with symptoms listed on the Queensland Health website including sudden onset of tiredness, muscle and joint pain, vomiting and diarrhoea.

They advise people suffering these symptoms to immediately see a doctor.

Mosquitoes are attracted by carbon dioxide in our breath that they can detect from great distances. If two people are outside, one will almost always get most of the mosquito bites.



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