GARDENING GURU: Clint Heathorn says good fertliser pays off with sweet rewards.
GARDENING GURU: Clint Heathorn says good fertliser pays off with sweet rewards.

Lettuce all grow healthy

WHEN I was a lad, my dad always had a rusty old metal garbage tin in the corner of the vegie patch filled with chook poo and water.

He called it his brew and according to him, it was the best drop for a great garden.

He would stir it up with a spade then scoop up helpings of the pungent goodness and pour it over every plant in sight.

Even though the concoction failed to pass the nose test every single time, he always grew great vegetables.

But now, with the old rusty rubbish bin eroded away in all but the grainy archives, there's a new product that takes organic fertilising to a new level.

Dr Grow It All liquid fertiliser is actually based on chook manure, but that's about where the similarities with my old man's recipe end.

After nine years of on-farm and scientific experimentation, the Dr Grow It All team has produced a biologically sustainable nutrient source for plants.

So what is sustainability when it comes to fertilisers?

The folks at Dr Grow It All use the example of popular chemical lawn boosters.

After you apply them to your lawn, it looks beautiful - lush and green.

But how long does it stay that way and what happens when you don't keep fertilising?

We all know the lawn loses its vigour and shine after a short time and actually looks worse than before. You're stuck in a cycle of driving more and more chemical into your soil just to keep your lawn alive.

Sounds crazy, doesn't it?

Neither your lawn nor your soil is biologically sustainable.

By trying to grow a better plant you're actually poisoning it and the soil in which it grows.

Now that is crazy.

To draw another simple analogy, the Dr Grow It All team describes chemical fertilisers for plants as having the same affect as a cup of coffee for humans.

You receive a short-term lift.

But it's neither sustainable, without regularly pouring caffeine into your body, or good for you.

Same with chemical fertilisers and their effects on soil and plants.

This is where Dr Grow It All comes in.

Everybody, from the home gardener to massive commercial crop operations, is starting to learn the benefits.

Stronger plants, higher yields, better crops and soil improving all the time.

Even tastier fruit and vegetables.

Dr Grow It All does this through living micro-organisms that occur naturally in the fertiliser but are multiplied by the millions because of added bacteria. It is this bacteria's effect on the micro-organism that gives this fertiliser the unique ability to constantly replenish and condition the soil naturally.

It's also pH neutral, which means your plants will draw it in immediately and start showing the benefits straight away.

Even if the soil is poor, heavier application rates will bring back the natural pH levels and condition the soil to the point where healthy and heavier-yielding crops can be achieved.

Dr Grow It All will also make your plants more resistant to pests and diseases.

But that's not the best thing for the home gardener.

Dr Grow It All, as the name suggests, can be used on every plant you have.

Seedlings, natives, flowers, fruit, vegetables, indoor plants and everything in between will benefit.

I've even trialled it on maidenhair ferns, which can be tricky at the best of times.

They're showing strong and healthy growth with not a hint of burning.

So, maybe all those years ago, my old man was on to something.

He had the sustainable thing going, but Dr Grow It All really does leave no stone unturned in providing a complete and balanced natural fertiliser that works.

And guess what.

There's no smell whatsoever.



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