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Labor's working hard for Ipswich

Opposition Leader Annastacia Palaszczuk chats with students from her former school, St Marys.
Opposition Leader Annastacia Palaszczuk chats with students from her former school, St Marys. Rob Williams

AFTER losing two of the three former safe local seats the State Opposition leader has promised to work hard to win Ipswich back.

Labor Party state leader Annastacia Palaszczuk was in Ipswich yesterday to visit her former high school, St Mary's.

She said the party was working to return the seats of Ipswich and Ipswich West to Labor.

"It's going to take a lot of hard work and a lot of effort over the coming years but you know we're out there listening to the community," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Labor incumbents Rachel Nolan and Wayne Wendt suffered swings of more than 20% against them in their respective seats of Ipswich and Ipswich West at the April election.

Ms Palaszczuk, whose seat of Inala includes Camira, Wacol and parts of Springfield, said Labor was rebuilding itself after it "breached the trust" of Ipswich voters while in power.

"I'll be coming to Ipswich quite a lot over the next couple of years in the lead-up to the election," she said. "Basically there was a breach of trust, we need to get out there, we need to start listening to people a lot more.

"We need to connect to people and present them with clear alternative policies."

Ms Palaszczuk said the LNP was repeating Labor's mistakes by not listening to what the people of Queensland wanted.

"We got caught up with government and not listening," she said.

"And what we can now see is the Newman government is not listening to the community.

"All these savage cuts that are happening, the job losses are going to have a real impact."

Ms Palaszczuk graduated from St Mary's in 1986.

She told the girls in attendance how she would catch the train to and from her family home in Durack to attend school.

She said the lessons she learnt from her days at the school had held her in good stead for her public life.

"The social justice principles of the Sisters of Mercy have shaped some of the most important and enduring lessons I have learned.

"The lessons of equity, empathy, compassion, fairness and acceptance I will carry with me every single day of my life."

Topics:  annastacia palaszczuk ipswich labor state opposition



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