SPEED TRAP: A police officer sits on a folding chair with a radar gun on Brisbane Rd on Friday morning.
SPEED TRAP: A police officer sits on a folding chair with a radar gun on Brisbane Rd on Friday morning. Rob Williams

Jury still out on nasty hidden speed cameras

ARE hidden speed cameras helping enforce the law, or are they just revenue raising?

We took to Facebook to find out what Ipswich thinks about the issue after a police officer conducting a speeding operation on Friday morning was snapped camouflaging his presence with trees and a shrub.

Readers were divided on the issue, with many supporting the need for hidden cameras to slow drivers down.

"Maybe police should take a few months off enforcing the road rules and see how many people get killed from speeding, drink driving, hooning and unroadworthy idiots on the road. At the end of the day, does the threat of a hidden camera keep you from putting your foot down? The answer for most is yes and if you don't want to be part of revenue raising, don't do something that will get you a fine," Julie McDonald commented.

Reader Naomi Steinhardt agreed with Ms McDonald.

"How I see it is, if you're obeying the road rules to begin with, you have nothing to worry about," she said.

Others backed up the use of hidden cameras.

"What does it matter? If the person is speeding they deserve to be fined. Revenue raising or not, the person is still breaking the law," Alysia Osborne said.

"The kids crossing the road that get run over don't see the speeding cars coming, the drivers who get involved in head-on collisions don't see the speeding cars coming. Why should the speeding drivers get the benefit of seeing the outcome in advance?" Amanda Draheim said.

But many readers fell on the other side of the issue, and called for speed cameras to be used as a deterrent.

"Speed cameras/radars should be used as a highly visible deterrent, not as a sneaky revenue raiser. How is his actions helping in the road safety campaign?" Robert Morrison said.

Paul Smart said hidden radar guns were blatant revenue raising.

"If they were serious about slowing people down, park a police car on the side of the road in plain sight. That way the people who get pinged speeding are the ones that truly deserve to be punished, not someone who has accidentally drifted over the speed limit," he said.

Renee Hewett said she agreed with the use of hidden cameras in places such as school zones, but described it as blatant revenue raising on a normal road.

Plenty of readers described the practice as revenue raising, but did not call for it to stop.

"It's revenue raising. However if you're not breaking the law you have nothing to worry about. Visual police presence is a more effective safety measure whether on the roads, at events wherever," Erin Rayner said.

"Bit of column A, bit of column B in my opinion. The way they were all out in force the first day school was back, that was revenue raising. They knew full well most people would forget and carry on doing 60," Sarah Louise said.

"I agree if you are not speeding, there is no worries, but I think the visual of seeing a radar is also a good reminder to watch your speed," Kelli Jane said.

WE want to know your views on hidden speed cameras. This picture was taken this morning of a police officer conducting a...

Posted by QT - The Queensland Times on Thursday, February 11, 2016


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