Brassall resident Joe Nolles is confused by the new Ipswich City Council flood maps, which he believes indicate that his property was inundated in the 1974 flood.
Brassall resident Joe Nolles is confused by the new Ipswich City Council flood maps, which he believes indicate that his property was inundated in the 1974 flood. Rob Williams

Joe's house stayed dry in 1974

RESIDENTS in rural areas aren't the only ones unhappy with recently released flood maps.

Joe Nolles, who lives on Hunter St, Brassall, said the map showed his property was almost totally inundated in 1974, but he said it hadn't flooded.

"It isn't helping my land value and could make it difficult to get flood insurance," Mr Nolles said.

"When you go to sell the property, people would say it's flood-affected and it isn't flood-affected. What's the point of putting it up if it's not accurate?"

However, Councillor Paul Tully said the maps had to be viewed in conjunction with property information to get the full picture.

In Mr Nolles' case, he said, it showed that while most of his property was flooded to some extent, his house was not flood-affected.

"Flooding is constituted by any depth of river flooding, basically from one centimetre to eight metres," Cr Tully said. "It's not that complex but we'll look to do the mathematical calculations for people. Until now, there has never been any depth analysis."

He said if people disputed the flood level on their property, they should contact the council.



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