This aerial shot of Colleges Crossing show the appalling destruction caused by the recent flood.
This aerial shot of Colleges Crossing show the appalling destruction caused by the recent flood. Pterodactyl Helicopters/Tina Percy-Greer

River's awesome power revealed

THE torrent has been and gone, but the receding waters have only served to reveal a trail of sludge, debris and destruction.

Pictures taken from the Pterodactyl Helicopter best show the way in which the Brisbane River steamrolled a new path during the devastating floods a fortnight ago.

Already battered by floods late last year, Colleges Crossing looked like it had been decimated by a nuclear bomb following the latest inundation.

An area once graced with green sloping hills, big gum trees and picnic areas was almost unrecognisable from the air.

Pterodactyl Helicopters pilot Mike Jarvis said parts of south-east Queensland resembled a moonscape.

“It was as if God had come down in a giant excavator and ripped the place apart,” Mr Jarvis said.

“You wouldn’t know it was the same place.

“In fact it has changed so much that it is even making navigation difficult for us because landmarks don’t look like they used to.”



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